Scholarship Selection

first_imgUniversity of Georgia food science graduate student Ikechukwu “Ike” Oguadinma, 27, has been awarded the Food Safety Auditing Scholarship from the Food Marketing Institute Foundation in partnership with the Safe Quality Food Institute.Oguadinma is one of 15 students who received the award at the SQF International Conference held last October in San Antonio, Texas. Each student received a $3,000 scholarship and an all-expense-paid trip to attend the conference with more than 850 food safety professionals.A native of Nigeria, Oguadinma came to the U.S. to study food science after earning an undergraduate degree in biochemistry. He selected UGA after researching leading food science teaching and research programs in the U.S.“I discovered that UGA has one of the best programs in food science in the country, boasting of esteemed food-safety researchers such as (Distinguished Research Professor) Dr. (Larry) Beuchat and (Regents Professor) Dr. (Michael) Doyle. These are very remarkable people and I knew to work with them and current outstanding faculty in the UGA food science department would teach me a lot and enable me to grow in my career,” he said.Before deciding on UGA, Oguadinma also reached out to UGA food science Distinguished Research Professor Casimir Akoh, also a native of Nigeria.“After learning of his remarkable work on synthetic infant milk fat formula and enzymatic transesterification of lipids, I knew I could translate my degree in biochemistry into food science; a world of possibilities was opened up to me,” Oguadinma said. “The science of food will be here forever because humans need the energy to survive. Today, people have become more aware of what they eat and have become smarter about their food consumption. Now more than ever, safe and healthy food is in high demand.”Oguadinma also appreciates the university’s culture.“I knew UGA was in the South and I have always heard about the South and its hospitality,” he said.Oguadinma came to the UGA Athens campus in 2017 and moved to the UGA Griffin campus in 2018 to conduct research under the guidance of UGA professor Ynes Ortega, a world-renowned parasitologist, at the UGA Center for Food Safety. His work with Ortega focused on two major parasites (Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cryptosporidium parvum) on parsley and cilantro. The parasites can contaminate herbs and fresh produce and cause severe diarrhea in infected individuals.“We looked at how well these parasites survive on these herbs in the field. Cilantro is hugely consumed in a lot of global cuisines, and herbs overall are widely known to be beneficial health-wise,” Oguadinma said. “You want them to be as safe as possible and this research was in response to a need in the food industry.”After completing his master’s degree in food science in fall 2019, Oguadinma began his doctoral studies with UGA Center for Food Safety microbiologist Govind Kumar. His project focuses on antibiotic resistance in microbes, like E. coli and Salmonella; their susceptibility to antimicrobials; and their behavior on different food matrixes.In addition to knowledge in food science and food safety, Oguadinma has learned a lot about leadership and communication at UGA. He serves as the president of the UGA-Griffin Student Advisory Council and is widely involved with on-campus activities.He credits his communication skills to growing up helping his mother, a pharmacist who owns and manages a retail pharmaceutical practice in Nigeria.“I learned to talk with people one on one — older people, young people, people who are patient, people who are not patient, a wide berth,” he said.The oldest of four children, Oguadinma misses his family back home in Nigeria and certain foods he can’t get in the U.S. but, despite cultural differences, he says the quality of life in the U.S. is much better than that of many other countries. “There are other cultural differences, like our predominantly communal way of life, which is different from the strong culture of independence here in the United States. Here on the UGA Griffin campus, you can meet people from a wide range of countries. The diversity is just amazing,” he said. “I’m learning so much in the U.S. and, in the long run, I want to get as much knowledge as I can about the food industry. I’ve learned so much in the few years I’ve been here and I know that I have so much more to learn.”To learn more about the UGA food science program, go to foodscience.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

Successful Debut of Laney’s BBQ Sauce

first_imgLaney’s BBQ Sauce was introduced to the local market with a tasting at the Jelly Mill. It was a huge success and exceeded all of Laney’sexpectations. Clint Lewis, owner of the Jelly Mill, said: “we’ve always thought the barbeque sauce on the ribs at Laney’s was the best in the world, so we are thrilled that Laney is now offering it for sale through our shop and others across the country. We always like to be proud of the quality of what we sell, and we know we can tell our customers sincerely that they’ll never find a better barbeque sauce anywhere–for ribs, chops, chicken or steak. When Laney set up a tasting here at The Jelly Mill, nearly every customer who tried it bought at least one jar. We are proud to be one of Laney’s first dealers, and we’re looking forward to a long relationship.”Sales of Laney’s BBQ Sauce are gaining momentum in New York City and surrounding areas. The sauce will again be available for tasting onSaturday and Sunday, June 8th and 9th at the Antique Car Show at Hildene Meadows. Stop by Laney’s booth, meet Laney and sample her delicioussauce.Laney’s BBQ Sauce, made from fresh herbs and the finest ingredients, is rich and thick in character. Its smooth zesty flavor enhances ribs,chicken, fresh fish, steaks, burgers and adds great flavor to your own sauces. For health conscious consumers, Laney’s BBQ Sauce has no fat, no cholesterol and is low in calories.Laney’s BBQ Sauce has been awarded the Vermont Seal of Quality. Ski Magazine declared Laney’s “the best ribs in Vermont” Laney’s customers declare our BBQ Sauce the “best ever.” Use this sauce with proven customer acceptance. Laney’s BBQ Sauce will be introduced to the national market at the Fancy Food Show at the Jacob Javitz Center in New York City in July.Laney’s Restaurant, Route 11/30 in Manchester was founded in 1988 by the Davis Family and continues to be owned and family operated by the Davis & Carieri Families. There success has been based on the consistent quality of their food and outstanding service. Laney’s lively contemporary Restaurant specializes in BBQ Ribs & Chicken with a wonderful selection of hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood and gourmet pizza’s cooked on the hearth of the first wood fired brick oven in Vermont.To order Laney’s BBQ Sauce please call the restaurant at 802-362-4456, stop in The Jelly Mill, Mary’s Kitchen in Manchester, VT or the Winhall Market in Bondvillelast_img read more

LeCOUNT Inc. is the International Business Council Exporter of the Year

first_imgLeCOUNT Inc., a White River Junction tool manufacturer, has been named Exporter of the Year by the Vermont International Business Council (VIBC), a standing committee of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce. LeCOUNT expanding mandrels and hydraulic workholding tooling are purchased by gear manufacturers in the U.S., Europe, Latin America, India, Japan, Canada, and China. The company is named after Charles W. LeCount, who patented his expanding mandrels in 1847.Presented to a company that has contributed significantly to Vermont’s international trade stature, the Exporter of the Year award recognizes the hard work, innovation, and vision displayed by companies competing in the global marketplace.LeCOUNT’s realization that it must compete in the global manufacturing market led management to develop a variety of foreign relationships, including exclusive distributor relationships, private label distribution agreements, and partnerships with much larger manufacturers to establish worldwide sales relationships. Chip Brettell, LeCOUNT Chief Executive Officer, noted: “The key to success is finding the right liaisons and supporting those affiliations in a proactive and efficient manner.”The Exporter of the Year award is given in recognition that flexibility and proactive marketing are keys to success in a global export market that is highly competitive and vulnerable to worldwide economic trends. Curtis Picard, Vermont Chamber Vice President of International Trade, remarked: “LeCOUNT sets the gold standard for the true test of a company’s success, measured by the ability to bring marketing, technical, and business ingenuity to the marketplace.”The VIBC’s mission is to advocate the use of international trade as an economic tool for Vermont businesses, and to encourage Vermont businesses to stimulate their economic well-being by participating in the global marketplace.Exporters honored in years past include Tubbs Snowshoes, Rock of Ages Corporation; Saint Michael’s School of International Studies; and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. LeCOUNT Inc. will receive the Exporter of the Year award at the May 27 International Trade Event featuring U.S. Ambassador to Canada Paul Cellucci. The international trade celebration is part of the Chamber’s Vermont Business and Industry EXPO. For more information about the International Trade Event or other EXPO special events, please log on to www.vtexpo.com(link is external).FACTSHHET: VERMONT INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COUNCIL EXPORTER OF THE YEARLeCOUNT, Inc.White River Junction, Vermont“Tooling Solutions Worldwide”LeCOUNT, Inc. is a tool manufacturer based in White River Junction, Vermont. The company’s expanding mandrels and hydraulic workholding tooling are purchased by gear manufacturers in the U.S., Europe, Latin America, India, Japan, Canada, and China.The Vermont International Business Council honors LeCOUNT, Inc. with the Exporter of the Year Award because:• It recognized early on that is needed to see the world as its marketplace;• It has developed and maintained quality sales channels around the world despite language, paperwork, legal, and cultural challenges;• It has proven that a small company in a rural state can compete with much larger companies on a global basis;• It has utilized state and federal resources in an efficient and timely manner;• It encourages others in its industry to understand the need to export in a shrinking United States manufacturing environment; and• LeCOUNT, Inc. and the jobs it provides would not exist if it were not for export sales.LeCOUNT, Inc. Highlights• The company is named after Charles W. LeCOUNT, who patented the expanding mandrel in 1847.• Founder and Chief Executive officer Chip Brettell worked for AT&T after receiving a BSME degree from the University of Vermont, and accomplished graduate work in the field of computer integrated manufacturing at Brigham Young University.• In 1990, Chip Brettell bought the assets (including early 1960’s-vintage machines) of a company called Tool Tech Corporation, where he had spent summers working as a teenager.• LeCOUNT, Inc. employs six people in the fields of sales and marketing, process engineering, assembly and inspection, engineering, accounting, and machining.• Gear manufacturers and end-users purchase LeCOUNT’s tooling, including makers of cars, jet engines, tractors, trucks, motorcycles, hand-held power tools, printers, exercise machines, airplanes, and machine tools.• The company manufactures a more precise version of the original LeCOUNT expanding mandrel, patented in 1847, as well as “special order” parts like hydraulic arbors, chucks, and chuck systems.• LeCOUNT, Inc. attends or is represented at tradeshows worldwide, including JIMTOF, a major machine tool exposition held in Japan; as well as shows in China, Brazil, and Germany.• Vermont Chamber of Commerce international trade specialists Curtis Picard and Chris Barbieri, as well as Susan Murray of the U.S. Department of Commerce Montpelier office, have assisted and advised LeCOUNT, Inc. in their efforts in Asia and the Pacific Rim.• Currently LeCOUNT, Inc. derives well over 50% of its annual revenue from export sales, enjoying a growth rate of about 5-7% per year over the past 4 years.last_img read more

Specialty Filaments, Pad Print, Olympic Precisioin get state money

first_imgCouncil Authorizes $1.5 Million Of Incentives Under New ProgramMONTPELIER, Vt. The Vermont Economic Progress Council has approved more than $1.5 million in job creation incentives under the states new economic development program, including assistance to the new owners of Specialty Filaments.At its meeting last week, the Council reviewed and authorized the first incentives under the new Vermont Employment Growth Incentive (VEGI) program, making three companies eligible to receive up to $1,329,404 in job creation incentives and $240,496 in property tax incentives.We are very pleased that one of our first authorizations under the new Vermont Employment Growth Incentive program was to assist the Monahan Company in preserving the jobs at the former Specialty Filaments facility, said Karen Marshall, Chair of the Vermont Economic Progress Council. Vermonts economic incentive program is going to work to keep Vermonters at work in Middlebury.Monahan SFI, LLC, a subsidiary of the Thomas Monahan Company of Arcola, Illinois was given preliminary authorization for $758,806 in economic incentives to add new jobs and invest in new machinery and equipment at Specialty Filaments, which closed and laid off 175 employees earlier in the month.The new subsidiary purchased the assets of Specialty Filaments, Inc. in a bankruptcy auction. Monahan SFI, LLC will re-open the plant and re-hire most of the employees laid off during the recent plant closing, and will submit a more detailed application for a full review at a later date.Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, Inc. was authorized for $331,399 in economic incentives to add new jobs and invest in a new facility and machinery and equipment. The East Dorset company plans to create a new subsidiary, Ink Jet Machinery of Vermont, to develop and manufacture digital inkjet print head engines.The company had been considering several options other than creating the new subsidiary, including outsourcing production to China or growing only a few jobs within Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, said Marshall.Olympic Precision, Inc. was authorized for $239,199 in economic incentives to create new jobs and invest in equipment by building the Center for Precision Manufacturing, a Department of Defense-funded research and development facility.The company and the Town of Windsor were authorized for property tax stabilization with an estimated value of $240,946, and will collaborate with the Windsor Improvement Corporation to redevelop a currently unusable lot and build a facility to house the Center, which will be operated by Olympic Precision, Inc.Under reforms passed by the General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Jim Douglas last year, the economic incentives were authorized based on job creation and capital investments that must occur before the company receives payment.The prior program had companies earning tax credits that were applied against future tax liability.The Council approved the applications after reviewing nine guidelines and applying a rigorous cost-benefit analysis that showed that because of the economic activity that will be generated by these projects, even after payment of the incentives the State will realize a net increase in revenues of $1,441,885.The Council also determined that these projects would not occur or would occur in a significantly different and less desirable manner if not for the incentives being authorized.The Vermont Economic Progress Council is an independent board consisting of nine Vermont citizens appointed by the governor that considers applications to the states economic incentive programs.The Council is attached to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, whose mission is to help Vermonters improve their quality of life and build strong communities.For more information, visit:http://www.thinkvermont.com/vepc/index.cfm(link is external)-30-last_img read more

Electric crews converge on Windham and Windsor counties

first_imgCrews converge on Windham and Windsor countiesTree damage in Wilmington area is worst many workers have ever seenRUTLAND (December 15, 2008)– After more than 90 hours of restoration work since the first customer went out last Friday, line and tree crews have restored service to 30,100 of the 35,000 CVPS customers who lost power after last week’s ice storm. CVPS has acquired 10 line crews from Hydro One in Canada. They will arrive on CVPS property late tonight to assist in the restoration effort tomorrow.Most customers in Windsor County will be back on by late Tuesday evening, but single customer outages and areas with extreme damage – especially the Wilmington, Readsboro, Wardsboro, Dover, Guilford area — will carry later into the week.More than 100 line crews and 50 tree crews are now working in Windham and Windsor counties. Ten tree crews from Ohio will also join the restoration effort today. Crews continue to make slow progress, as most repairs are off-road in isolated pockets.”In many cases, we have four to six crews working to clear dozens of trees from one line serving no more than 10 customers at a time,” said CVPS spokeswoman Christine Rivers. “Crews are putting in hours upon hours of work only to restore a few customers. We have tree crews that are spending an entire day cutting away ice and limbs on one section of line. Each repair is only going to turn on small numbers of customers. We may restore a large three-phase line, but then all the side taps off that line to customers’ homes are also down.”Crews reported some areas with more than an inch of ice accumulation in the Wilmington area. Many roads in area are still impassible or reduced to one lane due to downed and hanging trees and limbs. Some of lower elevations saw some unloading of ice Sunday, but the higher elevations, particularly above 1,100 feet in southern Vermont are still covered. Ice-laden trees broke over 50 poles – more than 40 of those in Windham County – and brought down hundreds of line, damaging or demolishing cross arms and line equipment.Estimates put the cost of the restoration effort around at least $3 million, ranking it just behind the April 2007 Nor’icane.”This is our second most costly storm, but it’s also a storm that has continued to strengthen state and local collaboration during emergency situations,” said Joe Kraus, CVPS’s vice president for engineering, operations and customer service. “State and local government, utilities and contractors have all focused on a safe, efficient restoration effort. That cooperation has speeded the restoration. We’ll do whatever it takes to bring back every customer.”Check with an electricianCVPS also reminded customers that while service lines or overhead wires that run from a pole to a house or business are the utility’s responsibility, the service cable that runs along the side of the house is the customer’s responsibility.If those service cables are damaged, customers should contact an electrician. The service bracket that attaches the service line to the house is generally maintained by CVPS. However, the weather head, attached to the service cable, which prevents water damage to the wiring, is maintained by the customer’s electrician.SAFETY FIRSTCVPS urges customers to take all necessary precautions to ensure their safety in the wake of the storm. The company offered the following tips for safely coping with the outages:* Treat any downed line as if it is live. Report the line to your local utility and fire department, stay at least 30 feet away from the line, and keep children and pets away as well.* If you waiting out the storm at your home without power, stay in contact with your neighbors. If you live alone, are HOMEBOUND, have LIFE-SUPPORT equipment, or live in a secluded area, stay in contact with a friend, relative or close neighbor.* If using a generator, read and follow the owner’s manual before starting the generator. Never operate a generator inside any structure or near a structure. Use a transfer switch to ensure electricity is not accidentally fed onto a line where line crews must work.* Keep freezers and refrigerators closed as much as possible to prevent food spoilage.* Turn off all electrical appliances except one light so you’ll know when service returns. Then, turn equipment back on slowly.last_img read more

Marsh appoints Julie Boucher to lead US captive management operations

first_imgMarsh, the world s leading insurance broker and risk advisor, has appointed Julie S. Boucher as leader of the firm s U.S. Captive Solutions Practice, which currently manages nearly 350 captive insurance companies in seven major U.S. domiciles and has 114 employees.Ms. Boucher, a managing director of Marsh based in the Burlington, Vermont office, will be responsible for the growth and development of the U.S. captive domicile operations, including Vermont, Connecticut, New York, South Carolina, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii. Ms. Boucher, who has been with Marsh for 21 years, has held a number of management positions with the firm.  Most recently, she was head of the firm s Captive Solutions Practice in Vermont, where she was responsible for overseeing all aspects of the firm s captive management and servicing operations in the state.  She also has been involved in establishing Marsh s operations in a number of existing U.S. captive domiciles.A certified public accountant, Ms. Boucher earned a B.S. degree in Accounting from the University of Southern Louisiana.  A member of the Vermont Society of CPAs and the AICPA, Ms. Boucher is active in the Vermont Captive Insurance Association and formerly served on the state s Captive Advisory Board.With nearly 450 employees in 31 captive insurance domiciles worldwide, Marsh s Captive Solutions Practice currently manages more than 1,100 captive insurance companies.  The Practice provides a full range of captive management services, including actuarial, auditing, benchmarking, captive assessments, and related advisory and consulting services, such as captive feasibility studies, strategic reviews, and assistance with domicile selection.Headquartered in New York, Marsh has 24,000 employees and provides advice and transactional capabilities to clients in over 100 countries. Marsh is a unit of Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (MMC), a global professional services firm with more than 54,000 employees and annual revenue exceeding $11 billion. MMC also is the parent company of Guy Carpenter, the risk and reinsurance specialist; Mercer, the provider of HR and related financial advice and services; Oliver Wyman, the management consultancy; and Kroll, the risk consulting firm. MMC s stock (ticker symbol: MMC) is listed on the New York, Chicago and London stock exchanges. MMC s Web Site is www.mmc.com(link is external) . Marsh s Web site is www.marsh.com(link is external).Source: Marsh. BURLINGTON, Vermont, April 7, 2009last_img read more

Chloramine study bill passes Senate, House agreement expected

first_imgYesterday, on a voice vote, the Vermont Senate passed legislation that studies alternatives to chloramine in drinking water. The bill, a revised version of H. 80, outlines an engineering study of disinfection methods that the Champlain Water District (CWD) and other water districts in the state could use instead of processes that rely on chloramine as a secondary disinfectant. House concurrence is expected later this week.  The study would be supported by funding from the EPA, secured through efforts by the state Department of Environmental Conservation.  An EPA contractor would perform the study.The legislation passed after months of work in the State House by People Concerned About Chloramine (PCAC), and Vermonters for a Clean Environment (VCE).  Its passage comes during national Drinking Water Week, and highlights the serious issues facing water systems around the country.PCAC coordinator Ellen Powell expressed both frustration and hope as the legislation moved forward.  This won t end the suffering, but it will hopefully get us more information, she said.  We re counting on the promises we have gotten that the study will be truly independent, and answer our specific questions.  If it does that, then it will be helpful to everyone, she said.The two groups continue to advocate for a multi-year moratorium to allow those suffering to have some relief, and to allow the CWD to work with regulators and community members to find a better way to provide clean, safe water to all their customers. A time out is really the only way we are going to get a solution to this problem, VCE Executive Director Annette Smith said.  If we didn t think it was possible and safe, we wouldn t support it.  This legislation will help us get us more information to assure legislators that a moratorium is both feasible and prudent, she stated.Chloramine has been linked to hundreds of reported cases of skin, breathing, and digestive problems since the CWD began using it in April 2006.  Chloramine use has also been linked to fish kills, infrastructure degradation, and elevated lead levels in some systems around the country. Reports of health impacts have been reported in over a dozen states.  PCAC and VCE are working with activists in New York, Pennsylvania, California, and other states on the issue.The CWD is currently the only system using chloramine in Vermont, though other systems, including Rutland City and Bennington, are reported to be considering its use. Even though the CWD and regulators continue to deny the connection between the tap water and health issues customers are experiencing, legislators are starting to listen to the people.  For that, we are grateful, Smith concluded.(See p. 2484 of May 6 House Calendar for text: http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2010/calendar/hc090506.pdf(link is external) )Source: Vermonters for a Clean Environment, Inc.last_img read more

Shelburne Museum receives award for Preservation and Care of Collections

first_img# # # Shelburne Museum has been selected to receive the 2009 Award for Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections. The national award, presented to just two museums this year, is determined by a panel of distinguished conservation experts from across the country and is presented jointly by Heritage Preservation and the American Institute for Conservation of Historic Artistic Works. The other recipient was Historic Cherry Hill in Albany, NY.“We are honored to be recognized by our peers for our work in caring for the many and varied collections at Shelburne Museum,” said Rick Kerschner, director of preservation and conservation at Shelburne Museum. “The museum’s diverse collection coupled with the environmental challenges presented by Vermont’s climate make our work both challenging and rewarding.”Eryl Wentworth, Executive Director of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, presents the 2009 Award for Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections to Rick Kerschner, director of preservation and conservation at Shelburne Museum.  The national award was presented on Friday, Sept. 25 and was awarded jointly by the Heritage Preservation. Pictured from left to right are: Stephan Jost, director; Nancie Ravenel, objects conservator; Rick Kerschner, director of preservation and conservation; Eryl Wentworth, executive director of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works; James Pizzagalli, chairman of the board of trustees; Michael Polemis, board member and chairman of the museum’s Collections Committee.Shelburne Museum was selected for showing a sustained and exemplary commitment to preserving America’s heritage and for enriching the community by caring for its unique and varied collections through dedicated planning and effort.  Those efforts include the gamut of collections care from innovative lighting to environmental control and security measures that allow the public safe access to artifacts.“The committee was especially impressed by the museum’s creativity and innovative thinking in caring for such a unique and varied collection,” said Eryl Wentworth, Executive Director of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. She also applauded the museum’s “long standing commitment to preserving its extraordinary collection.”The Conservation Department was established in 1983. Shelburne was singled out for developing a plan for the museum’s unique collections that includes buildings, carriages, a lighthouse, a covered bridge and a steamboat.  The museum was also recognized for enriching the field of conservation and collection care under the tutelage of Kerschner and Object Conservator Nancie Ravenel.Over 25 years, 61 conservators have been trained at the museum. Public outreach through exhibits and fundraising programs, such as the Adopt a Carousel Animal program, have raised awareness of the museum and the importance of conservation.The Award for Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections has been presented annually since 1999. Previous recipients include Colonial Williamsburg and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.About Shelburne Museum: Located in Vermont’s scenic Lake Champlain Valley, Shelburne Museum is one of the nation’s finest, most diverse and unconventional museums of art, design and Americana. Over 150,000 works are exhibited in a remarkable setting of 39 exhibition buildings, 25 of which are historic and were relocated to the museum grounds. The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works is the national membership organization of professional conservators dedicated to preserving the art and historic artifacts of our cultural heritage for future generations. Heritage Preservation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving our nation’s heritage. Its members include museums, libraries, archives, and other organizations concerned with saving the past for the future. Source: SHELBURNE, Vermont (Sept. 25, 2009) Shelburne Museum.last_img read more

China challenges U.S. solar tariffs at WTO

first_imgChina challenges U.S. solar tariffs at WTO FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:China says it is challenging a U.S. tariff hike on solar panels before the World Trade Organization, adding to its sprawling conflicts with President Donald Trump over trade and technology.The 30 percent tariffs announced in January improperly help U.S. producers in violation of WTO rules, the Commerce Ministry said. It said a formal complaint was filed Tuesday with the WTO in Geneva.The solar duties are separate from tariff hikes imposed by the Trump administration starting in July on Chinese imports in response to complaints Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology. The duties also apply to imports of solar cells and modules from Europe, Canada, Mexico and South Korea. That strained relations with U.S. allies.The Trump administration has defended the solar tariffs as necessary to protect American producers, saying import prices were unfairly low due to subsidies and other improper support.Washington took action under a 1974 U.S. law instead of through the WTO. That led to complaints it was undermining the global trade body. U.S. officials say such action is necessary because the WTO lacks the ability to address Chinese trade tactics.WTO complaints begin with negotiations between parties to the dispute. If those fail, the case moves to a panel of experts who can decide whether the trade controls are improper.More: China files WTO challenge to US tariffs on solar panelslast_img read more

Largest U.S. co-op taps Aggreko for Texas storage project

first_imgLargest U.S. co-op taps Aggreko for Texas storage project FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Energy Storage News:A large-scale battery storage system will be built in Texas for the U.S.’s biggest electric utility cooperative, to time-shift solar-generated loads and provide grid services to transmission operator ERCOT.Mobile energy solutions provider Aggreko, which recently took over German-U.S. energy storage pioneers Younicos and incorporated it as a division of the parent company, announced to Energy-Storage.news yesterday that it has signed an agreement for a 2.25MW / 4.5MWh battery storage project with Pedernales Electric Cooperative (PEC).According to Karim Wazni, managing director of Aggreko Microgrid and Storage Solutions (essentially formerly Younicos), the cooperative picked his company out for the project due to its existing track record of “active and successful participation in the ERCOT market.” Aggreko has already executed five battery projects in Texas, including the ongoing updates and upgrades of the large-scale battery system at Notrees Wind Farm.The project is notable for two reasons: firstly, that in addition to providing power services to ERCOT markets, the battery storage system, which should be capable of storing and discharging 2.25MW of power for two hours, will also provide energy capacity to the local network. As a general trend, customers for large-scale energy storage systems are now seeking this longer duration energy storage as well as the ability to use batteries for high powered, short duration applications, Saft’s Michael Lippert pointed out in a recent interview.The second notable aspect for Aggreko Microgrid and Storage Solutions is that unlike other recent projects, and the projects it is currently working on going forwards, this project for PEC is an asset sale, as opposed to the mobile power ‘as-a-service’ or energy storage ‘as-a-service’ business model the company is rapidly becoming known for. “In this case, the storage project is an asset sale, which is what the cooperative was looking for, not an as-a-service offer,” an Aggreko spokesperson told Energy-Storage.news yesterday.Going forwards, Aggreko is expected to unveil a large project in New York State soon which will provide National Grid with solutions to defer spending large sums expanding transmission and distribution (T&D) infrastructure in the next few days. “We will be inaugurating a plant in New York State in two weeks, it’s a National Grid project where we’re providing 2MW of power for two hours, and that will be able to deliver peak shaving services to a substation,” Wazni said, adding that even these sorts of larger infrastructure projects could be done ‘as-a-service’.More: Power and capacity will be provided by Aggreko’s 4.5MWh Texas ‘legacy’ projectlast_img read more