Breaking Travel News interview: Andreas Scheck, vice president, sales, LATAM | Focus

first_imgAndreas Scheck: This is an award given by passengers, therefore, having been recognised by them gives us great satisfaction and it inspires us to continue looking for innovative ways to fulfil our customers’ needs and improve their travel experience.BTN: How useful are accolades such as the World Travel Awards for airlines such as LATAM when it comes to promoting the brand to consumers?AS: We have focused on understanding the new needs of the Covid-19 and post-Covid-19 customer – focusing on how much travellers value safety in their journey, flexibility in the purchase decision process and connectivity across the network. – Advertisement – OlderBTN interview: Alexandra Vila, global senior manager, brand strategy and communications, LATAM BTN: Can you describe the mood in South American aviation in late 2020 – are we looking for a recovery as we head into next year?AS: As IATA announced, we expect the industry to recover pre pandemic demand by 2024, at a much slower pace than what the industry projected. But we are optimistic: LATAM Group is ready to fly when our customers are by implementing the highest safety standards, offering passenger peace of mind when they purchase their tickets through commercial flexibility and servicing, to date, 106 destinations around the world. Our mood is of service: we will be ready when you decide to fly. BTN: How will the new LATAM relationship with Delta Air Lines help both carriers meet the needs of passengers moving forward?AS: Our long-term alliance with Delta is focused to allow our passengers to access more connectivity with our complimentary destination networks. This alliance will offer our clients a better travel experience between Latin America and the USA.More InformationLATAM Airlines Group is the leading airline group in Latin America with one of the largest route networks in the world, offering services to 145 destinations in 26 countries, including six domestic markets in Latin America – Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru – in addition to international operations in Latin America, Europe, the United States, the Caribbean, Oceania, Africa and Asia.Find out more on the official website. This recognition motivates us to keep improving every day. We have never stopped flying during the pandemic, despite the multiple restrictions imposed by the authorities worldwide. More than 33,000 people returned home within the region thanks to the special flights we carried out, despite the limitations of the pandemic. – Advertisement – Voters at the World Travel Awards have honoured LATAM with a number of top titles – here we find out how it feels to have won from vice president of sales, Andreas ScheckBreaking Travel News: Congratulations – LATAM has been recognised as South America’s Leading Airline by voters at the World Travel Awards – how does it feel to have won?- Advertisement – NewerBTN interview: Gloria Gallardo, president, Guayaquil Public and Municipal Company of Tourism – Advertisement –last_img read more

Keck study a step towards curing cancer

first_imgResearchers from the Keck School of Medicine have found a way to genetically modify mice so the rodents’ immune systems act like human immune systems, a discovery that will impact medical testing.Doctors Weiming Yuan, Xiangshu Wen, Seil Kim and Agnieszka Lawrenczyk published the study this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research took about two years and the project will be completed within four years.Yuan, the project’s chief investigator, began work on the mice a few years ago, after he recognized that current clinical trials were not successful. Yuan attributed this to minor differences between human and rodent immune systems. This difference led him to attempt to humanize the mouse model.“Making a mouse is a challenging project,” Yuan said. “This will be helping a lot of scientists to further clinical trials.”The mice contribute to research toward finding better treatments for cancer. When tested on mice, the drug α-GalCer successfully rid the animal of cancerous cells. The same results, however, were not obtained when the medication was used on human subjects, showing differences between the two species’ immune systems.The mice modification project required the successful insertion of a new functioning gene. This type of modification is far more challenging than so-called “knock-out” genetic modification, which is modification that works by eliminating a gene’s function. Yuan said the next step will be to further humanize the T-cell receptor, which activates lymphocytes that initiate immune system responses.The team used the difficulty of the project as motivation to succeed. Yuan said they were all very enthusiastic about their research despite difficulty working with the small size of their grant.“[We] definitely needed more funding — it’s the practical challenges,” Yuan said. “Lots of scientists are concerned about the funding situation.”The team hopes to further their work in the humanization of the rodents’ immune system.“We will branch out, but right now we have more work to further humanize the mice,” Yuan said. “We still have quite a lot of work to do before we branch out.”The dedication and enthusiasm of the team is only gaining momentum. “The future model will be even more reliable,” Yuan said.last_img read more