Kamala Harris Makes California History

first_img“She maybe didn’t quite imagine this moment,” Ms. Harris said of her mother. “But she believed so deeply in an America where a moment like this is possible, and so I am thinking about her and about the generations of women, Black women, Asian, white, Latina, Native American women — who throughout our nation’s history have paved the way for this moment tonight.”There is one more historic distinction that in some ways encapsulates all of the above: Ms. Harris is a Californian. Her casual use of the Tamil word “chittis” to refer to her aunts in her nomination acceptance speech was remarkable largely because it was onstage at the Democratic National Convention.“I’m Tamil myself and it has a resonance for people who use that word as part of how they talk about their families,” Mr. Ramakrishnan said. “But things like that, immigrants in general can relate to — even if you don’t understand the word.”Ms. Harris’s long career in the Golden State also means that for Californians especially, her status as a barrier-breaking politician is only one part of a complex legacy as San Francisco’s and the state’s former “top cop.”And while representation can be powerful, as we saw repeatedly during the presidential race, it’s not everything. Todd Gloria, who will be San Diego’s next mayor, will be the first person of color to have the job, as well as the first openly gay man. He’s also entering the office with new mayoral power. [The San Diego Union-Tribune] What’s in a name? For Kamala Harris, like many other Americans, it’s a way of expressing identity. [NBC News] – Advertisement – Read the full story about Ms. Harris’s ascension to the vice presidency. [The New York Times] Read more background on the bitter fight. [The New York Times] On Saturday, Gov. Gavin Newsom, in addition to describing Ms. Harris, a fellow San Francisco politician and friend, as “a walking, whip-smart embodiment of the California Dream,” tweeted a celebratory video of her dancing in the rain soundtracked by a song popular on TikTok that says, “I’m sorry for drippin’, but drip is what I do.” In the video, Ms. Harris sported her signature combination. Listen to Ms. Harris talk about growing up with Indian and Jamaican roots in Northern California on the Asian Enough podcast. [The Los Angeles Times] If you missed it: A crowd danced in the streets outside Ms. Harris’s childhood home in Berkeley. [The San Francisco Chronicle] His vice president will be Senator Kamala Harris.Her rise to the highest office in the nation ever occupied by a woman has been full of historic milestones: the first Black woman to become San Francisco’s and then California’s top prosecutor, the second Black woman to become a senator.Now, not only will she be the first woman vice president, she will also be the first Black woman, the first South-American woman, and the first daughter of immigrants to hold the role.- Advertisement – In her speech on Saturday night, she drew a direct line from her mother, Dr. Shyamala Gopalan Harris, who came to the United States when she was 19, through her own career and to generations of women in the future. Diana Gutierrez, 26, who joined a group parading through downtown to a rally at Pershing Square on Saturday morning, said she was undocumented in 2016 when President Trump was elected; she had come from Peru with her family in 2002 as a young child.She and Cori Bratby-Rudd, 26, said they hadn’t been dating long when they decided to get married four years ago, in part because they were worried Ms. Gutierrez would be deported.But a Biden victory brought enormous relief. Ms. Harris’s ascension was a significant factor.“I can’t even explain it,” she said, “for there to be a Black woman vice president with the ability to speak for immigrants. ”Ms. Bratby-Rudd added, “We’re elated.”Shanyn Stokes, 28, said: “I think she’s been doing the best she can. I do believe her heart’s in the right place.”Ms. Stokes, who is Black, said Ms. Harris’s victory was an encouraging sign that Americans increasingly see women — and Black women specifically — as capable of any job a white man could do.Now, Ms. Stokes said, “I’m very hopeful to see what she does.” Read about what a Californian vice president means for the state. [The New York Times] Ms. Harris’s ancestral town in southern India also rejoiced at her win, but across the country, Indians wondered how things will change under a Biden-Harris administration. [The New York Times] Read about how her parents found a home, and each other, in a Black study group in Berkeley. [The New York Times] Here’s a guide to the races we’ve been watching in the Golden State. [The New York Times]And see all California results, including how each county voted in the presidential race. [The New York Times]California Today goes live at 6:30 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com. Were you forwarded this email? Sign up for California Today here and read every edition online here.Jill Cowan grew up in Orange County, graduated from U.C. Berkeley and has reported all over the state, including the Bay Area, Bakersfield and Los Angeles — but she always wants to see more. Follow along here or on Twitter.California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley. Read a deeper dive into how Ms. Harris broke California’s “curse.” [New York Times Opinion] Darrell Issa, the Republican former congressman, beat Ammar Campa-Najjar, a Democrat, for the San Diego-area seat formerly occupied by Duncan Hunter. [The New York Times] George Gascón, San Francisco’s former district attorney who pitched himself as a progressive reformer, will become Los Angeles’s district attorney. District Attorney Jackie Lacey conceded on Friday. [The Los Angeles Times] Read more: Good morning.Joseph R. Biden Jr. has been elected president of the United States.- Advertisement – (This article is part of the California Today newsletter. Sign up to get it delivered to your inbox.)Here’s what else to know today For many Californians, Ms. Harris’s comfortable embrace of her multicultural upbringing and her decidedly West Coast vibe have felt familiar.“She brings a California sensibility, you know: the blazers with the Chucks,” Karthick Ramakrishnan, a professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside, told me. “I think it will be a breath of fresh air in D.C.” Ms. Harris has spoken out on issues of police misconduct, but she has struggled to reconcile her calls for reform with her record as California’s “top cop.” Here’s a look at how that’s played out. [The New York Times] – Advertisement –last_img read more

Shell begins divestment of Masela block

first_imgShell has received government permission to open geological data on the gas-rich Masela block in Maluku to potential buyers, marking its first step in divesting the asset.The company will divest the block over an estimated 18 months time while the block’s lead operator, Japan’s Inpex Corp, and the Upstream Oil and Gas Special Regulatory Taskforce (SKK Migas) would focus on developing the nationally-strategic Abadi gas project within the block, said an SKK Migas official.Read also: Shell plans to exit gas-rich Masela Block project“The aim is to have [Abadi] onstream by 2027 and we have agreed with operators to try and stick with this schedule,” SKK Migas head Dwi Soetjipto told lawmakers on Monday.He emphasized that Shell would continue developing the Abadi field despite having received permission from the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry and the Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) to begin divestment.Shell’s plan to exit the Masela block dealt a major blow to Indonesia’s energy ambitions as the block, which holds 10.7 trillion cubic feet of proven gas reserves, carries the biggest investment value among Indonesia’s four nationally-strategic oil and gas assets.The Masela block, which is 35 percent operated by Shell and 65 percent operated by Japan’s Inpex Corp, holds the Abadi project slated to produce 347 thousand barrels of oil equivalent (mboepd) per day, which is more than the other three assets, SKK Migas data show.The block’s Abadi project reached 2.2 percent completion as of June this year, below the targeted 10.5 percent, due to lockdown-related delays, according to the data.Read also: As Chevron exit looms, Indonesia eyes Italian Eni to take over IDD gas megaproject”[Shell] looked at the global portfolios under them and decided that investment in other countries was more profitable,” said Inpex Indonesia corporate service vice president Henry Banjarnahor, also on Monday.He said Inpex and SKK Migas were working to procure equipment, complete an environmental impact assessment, acquire land, secure gas buyers and map local weather patterns, among others activities, in the Abadi field.Shell Indonesia did not immediately respond for comment.Topics :last_img read more

Ship Recycling Transparency Initiative’s Online Platform Goes Live

first_imgThe Ship Recycling Transparency Initiative’s (SRTI) online platform, a tool for sharing information on ship recycling to drive responsible practice, was launched earlier today.The platform comes nine months after a group of shipping companies led by Hapag-Lloyd and Maersk, first announced their collective effort to use the market-drivers that transparency brings to make responsible ship recycling the norm.The platform aims to create a level-playing field for responsible recycling by giving shipping companies an opportunity to be transparent on their approach to ship dismantling, creating fair competition, improving performance and enabling the shipping industry to be held to account.In 2017, 835 ships were recycled out of a world fleet of 50,0001. Out of these, 80.3% or 543 large ocean-going commercial vessels reached the tidal beaches of Bangladesh, India and Pakistan, according to the data from NGO Shipbreaking Platform.“With transparency on shipping companies’ ship recycling policies and practices, it becomes possible for the industry’s stakeholders – including shippers, lenders, investors and insurers – to make informed decisions. The importance of such decisions is increasing with the growing expectation for companies to take responsibility for their value chain sustainability,” the Sustainable Shipping Initiative (SSI) said.Image Courtesy: Global Maritime Forum, 2018As disclosed, the SRTI is neither a standard nor a rating tool, it is an online platform that shipping companies can use to disclose relevant information on ship recycling. The information is readily available to the industry’s stakeholders, as well as the broader public.“The SRTI is unique in that it tells a positive story, shining a light on what is actually possible in terms of responsible ship recycling. We’ve seen what transparency has done in other sectors, in some cases prompting immediate and transformative change,” Andrew Stephens, Executive Director of the SSI, said.“Knowledge is power, and with knowledge comes responsibility. We believe that through the simple act of companies being transparent about their approach to ship recycling, we can support improved policy, practice and performance – from the cradle to the grave.”“We find it anomalous that many ship-owners provide superintendency in ship building yards to ensure quality control and good health, safety and environmental practices even before the ship is handed over to the owners, and similarly throughout the operational life of the ship, but subsequently at the point of sale most owners wash their hands of all responsibility for these issues and externalise the necessary costs for these,” James Woodrow, Managing Director, The China Navigation Company, said.Commenting on the issue, Søren Toft Chief Operating Officer A.P. Moeller-Maersk, said that most ship recycling still happens under unacceptable standards.“In the absence of effective regulation the market must act to raise the standards and to enable a level playing field. With the launch today, we encourage all fellow ship owners to sign up to the SRTI and cargo owners and investors to start using it,” he added.Despite the known risks associated with ship recycling there is no global regulation currently in force. International conventions such as the Basel Convention, the Hong Kong Convention, IMO guidelines for the development of the ship recycling plan, and EU regulations provide only partial coverage of material aspects associated with ship recycling. What is more, there are no generally accepted voluntary standards to help fill this regulatory gap.The SRTI is hosted by the Sustainable Shipping Initiative and brings together shipowners, investors, banks, insurers, cargo owners and other key stakeholders from across the maritime industry. Its founding signatories include shipowners The China Navigation Company, Hapag-Lloyd, A.P. Moeller-Maersk, NORDEN, Stolt Tankers and Wallenius Wilhelmsen; financial stakeholders GES, Nykredit and Standard Chartered Bank; classification society Lloyd’s Register; and sustainability non-profit Forum for the Future.last_img read more