Chloramine study bill passes Senate, House agreement expected

first_imgYesterday, on a voice vote, the Vermont Senate passed legislation that studies alternatives to chloramine in drinking water. The bill, a revised version of H. 80, outlines an engineering study of disinfection methods that the Champlain Water District (CWD) and other water districts in the state could use instead of processes that rely on chloramine as a secondary disinfectant. House concurrence is expected later this week.  The study would be supported by funding from the EPA, secured through efforts by the state Department of Environmental Conservation.  An EPA contractor would perform the study.The legislation passed after months of work in the State House by People Concerned About Chloramine (PCAC), and Vermonters for a Clean Environment (VCE).  Its passage comes during national Drinking Water Week, and highlights the serious issues facing water systems around the country.PCAC coordinator Ellen Powell expressed both frustration and hope as the legislation moved forward.  This won t end the suffering, but it will hopefully get us more information, she said.  We re counting on the promises we have gotten that the study will be truly independent, and answer our specific questions.  If it does that, then it will be helpful to everyone, she said.The two groups continue to advocate for a multi-year moratorium to allow those suffering to have some relief, and to allow the CWD to work with regulators and community members to find a better way to provide clean, safe water to all their customers. A time out is really the only way we are going to get a solution to this problem, VCE Executive Director Annette Smith said.  If we didn t think it was possible and safe, we wouldn t support it.  This legislation will help us get us more information to assure legislators that a moratorium is both feasible and prudent, she stated.Chloramine has been linked to hundreds of reported cases of skin, breathing, and digestive problems since the CWD began using it in April 2006.  Chloramine use has also been linked to fish kills, infrastructure degradation, and elevated lead levels in some systems around the country. Reports of health impacts have been reported in over a dozen states.  PCAC and VCE are working with activists in New York, Pennsylvania, California, and other states on the issue.The CWD is currently the only system using chloramine in Vermont, though other systems, including Rutland City and Bennington, are reported to be considering its use. Even though the CWD and regulators continue to deny the connection between the tap water and health issues customers are experiencing, legislators are starting to listen to the people.  For that, we are grateful, Smith concluded.(See p. 2484 of May 6 House Calendar for text: http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2010/calendar/hc090506.pdf(link is external) )Source: Vermonters for a Clean Environment, Inc.last_img read more

Temporary ban on crossing the border crossings of the Republic of Croatia extended

first_imgIn the past 24 hours, 86 new cases were recorded, so the number of currently ill (active cases) in Croatia today is 738, according to data from the Civil Protection Headquarters of the Republic of Croatia. The Civil Protection Headquarters of the Republic of Croatia extended today Decision on temporary prohibition of crossing the border crossings of the Republic of Croatia. BiH citizens can go to the Republic of Croatia for tourist reasons, but a negative PCR test is needed, so that they do not have to isolate themselves As pointed out in the Decision, the exceptions are third-country nationals entering the Republic of Croatia due to tourism (lease or flat-rate camp payment agreement, permanent berth in a nautical tourism port, etc.) or other business reasons or other economic interests. Third country nationals not subject measure quarantine / self-isolation, if at the border crossing presented negative PCR test result swabs nose and throat on SARS-Cov-2, not older than 48 hours (counting from the time of swabbing to arrival at the border crossing).If third-country nationals have a 48-hour test when entering Croatia, they will be allowed to enter Croatia, with a measure of self-isolation and re-testing in Croatia at their own expense. The above can be applied to passengers and crew members on yachts.center_img This Decision is does not relate to nationals of EU Member States or Schengen Member States and Schengen Associated States as well as members of their families, and third-country nationals who are long-term residents under Council Directive 2003/109 / EC on the status of third-country nationals of long-term residence. It is still recommended to announce the arrival of entry into the Republic of Croatia through the application entercroatia.mup.hr, to all tourists. Persons who do not present a negative PCR test are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine / self-isolation measure.last_img read more

The market in minutes

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Premiers to focus on Quebec over pipelines religious symbols at conference

first_imgSASKATOON — Canada’s premiers are meeting in Saskatoon on the final day of their annual gathering with Quebec expected to be at the centre of talks.Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he is trying to work with Quebec Premier Francois Legault on moving oil through the province by pipeline as part of a future energy corridor.But Legault says there is no “social acceptability” in Quebec for oil pipelines.Kenney says he believes Legault understands the financial pain Albertans are feeling.He says provinces that receive equalization payments should help develop resources that pay the bills in the federation.Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister says he plans to express his concerns with Legault about Quebec’s new law that bans public servants in positions of power from wearing religious symbols.Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe is hosting the meeting of The Council of the Federation and says some disagreements are expected.The premiers are also to discuss health care, Arctic sovereignty and cannabis. Bill Graveland and Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Presslast_img read more