Walsalls packed

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Surprising number of people will tolerate streets with funny names

first_imgBonar Street in Morningside. Photo: Google MapsMs Mulholland said she had never encountered a buyer who rejected a home based on the street name, though when she worked on the south side of Brisbane many Asian buyers would avoid the number four and flock to the number eight. She said on the peninsula, the more serious buyers ignored the potentially funny side of certain names, while those with more of a sense of humour would have a giggle and move on. “People from outside of the area tend to pause before saying certain names or they’ll try to describe where it is near or refer to a building name,” she said. “But it doesn’t stop them inquiring about properties on those streets.” Even Google Maps thinks Bald Knob Road in Peachester is a little risqué.BRISBANE is home to some giggle-inducing street names but sellers need not worry with a new survey showing most homebuyers wouldn’t be turned off by an unappealing address. That’s good news for the residents of Bald Knob Rd, Gross Ave and Weenah St. The Finder.com.au poll found only 4 per cent of Queenslanders, and 16 per cent of Australians, would forego a home because of an embarrassing street name, while a quarter of those surveyed would avoid a dodgy suburb name. Woodcock Street in Scarborough. Photo: Google MapsWhen it comes to renters, 14 per cent would avoid a funny street name and 28 per cent would steer clear of suburbs with unappealing names. Ray White Redcliffe real estate agent Loren Mulholland is no stranger to tricky names with the Redcliffe peninsula home to such gems as Hornibrook Esplanade, Dix St, Woodcock St, Humpybong Esplanade and Silcock St. “I try to keep things professional but when you first hear some of the names, you do have a bit of a laugh,” she said. “I’ve been on the peninsula since 2009 so I’m a bit desensitised now and I think most locals are the same.“Phallic-related names get the most giggles — like Cox St and Woodcock St — and anything at number 69 gets a laugh.” center_img Humpybong Park in Redcliffe. Photo: Google MapsMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus22 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market22 hours agoThe Finder survey of 2010 Australians found street appeal was thing that turned off the most buyers (53 per cent), while only 5 per cent would avoid a home due to a street number.Bessie Hassan, Money Expert at finder.com.au, said while sellers couldn’t do much about a terrible street or suburb name, they could make sure the house looked good from the street.“If they are already uncertain about the street name, you don’t want to detract or put off potential buyers if they arrive to find overgrown garden or broken garage door,” she said. “Updating the front of the home and garden could make the property more enticing to many more buyers.” The southeast’s funniest street names Bald Knob Rd, PeachesterBonar St, MorningsideBottomley St, BrassallButland St, Bracken RidgeButt St, HarristownChubb St, One MileFanny St, AnnerleyGross Ave, HemmantHornibrook Esplanade, ClontarfHumpybong Esplanade, RedcliffeHiscock Rd, Woodhill Wanka Rd, Cecil Plains Weenah St, Bracken RidgeWoodcock St, ScarboroughWoodcock St, Paddington StWoollybutt St, New AucklandWoodswallow Ct, Greenbank,last_img read more

Peace sets deadline for takeover

first_imgWest Brom chairman Jeremy Peace has set a summer deadline for any investors to buy the club. Press Association Peace’s valuation of Albion is based on the new £5billion broadcast rights deal for the Barclays Premier League, with clubs expected to net even more cash when the overseas broadcast rights are sold. Groups from China, America and Australia are understood to be interested in the Baggies with at least one consortium being given a tour of the club’s stadium and training ground. Peace confirmed in February he was looking for fresh investment in the wake of the new broadcast rights contract. He told the club’s site: “I said in 2008 that I was open to proposals regarding investment in the club and would not stand in the way of a new owner providing they convinced me their intentions for the club were in keeping with its traditions and values and their ability to deliver on them was realistic. “Nothing has changed in that regard. The recent announcement of a new and record media rights deal for the Premier League from season 2016-17 is sure to mean that there is once again huge interest in the brand. “It was only right and prudent, in my view, that at such a moment we should present the Club to the investment market.” Albion are 14th in the Barclays Premier League, seven points above the relegation zone, and host bottom side Leicester on Saturday. center_img The Baggies owner wants to avoid a long takeover saga at The Hawthorns and would be prepared to shelve any deal – if not completed – by early June, Press Association Sport understands. Peace, who has been majority shareholder since 2005, is believed to want between £150million and £200million for the Baggies. last_img read more

How much testosterone is too much for a female athlete?

first_imgThe Caster Semenya caseSouth Africa | DANIEL KELLY | The South African athlete, Caster Semenya, has lost her case against the athletic governing body, IAAF, which means that she will have to take medication to lower her testosterone levels if she wishes to continue competing internationally in running events.Last year, the IAAF introduced new regulation for female athletes with “difference of sexual development” (DSD). Athletes with circulating testosterone of five nanomoles per litre of blood (5nmol/L) or above and who are androgen-sensitive, have to meet certain criteria if they wish to compete internationally. One criterion is that DSD athlete must use medication to reduce their blood testosterone level to below 5nmol/L for a continuous period of at least six months.Semenya felt that the IAAF was targeting her, specifically. She took her case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), but the court rejected the 28-year-old athlete’s challenge against the IAAF’s new rules. Although CAS found the rules to be discriminatory, it also said that they were “necessary, reasonable and proportionate”.Difference of sexual developmentSo what exactly is DSD and does a serum testosterone level above 5nmol/L really confer an unfair advantage in running events? DSDs are a group of rare conditions that are acquired before birth, where the reproductive organs and genitals don’t develop as expected. While the condition can be inherited, it usually occurs at random.A person with DSD may have a mix of both male and female sexual characteristics. For example, they may be genetically female, but with reproductive organs that are of the opposite sex (or the other way around), a combination of both male and female, or not clearly either.As the testes are the primary site of testosterone production, if a female is born with these male reproductive organs, their testosterone level will be high, often reaching male levels. Testosterone is involved in many factors that may confer athletic benefit including increased muscle size and strength, along with the ability for the blood to deliver oxygen to those working muscles. This is why elite male athletes are generally faster and stronger than females – and also why males don’t compete against females in most sports. Semenya has high levels of testosterone so she will undoubtedly have at least some associated metabolic benefits.How much benefit testosterone gives female athletes is difficult to define as women cannot convert testosterone into its more potent form and do not possess the same numbers of testosterone receptors (to carry out its actions) as men. The IAAF level of 5nmol/L is still high for female levels, which normally range from 0.1 – 1.8nmol/L. Judging the actual benefit of testosterone and where to draw these lines would require a lot more research and investigation.Where does it stop?However, Semenya hasn’t artificially altered her testosterone levels and while her condition is rare – and gives her a large advantage as a track athlete, they are naturally occurring – so is it not discrimination to make her change her body to compete? Does this take the phrase “all men are equal” to the extreme and try to make everyone the same, even by artificial measures? And where does this stop? Many genetic physical attributes can contribute to athletic performance such as height, muscle composition and aerobic capacity.Dutee Chand, the female sprinter who was also barred from competing against women in 2014 because her natural levels of testosterone exceeded guidelines for female athletes, publicly expressed her disbelief as to why she was penalised for her natural body when she competes against women who are taller and from wealthier backgrounds, which certainly put them at an advantage.Cases like Semenya and Chand will always be contentious and generate more questions than solutions, and there will always be disagreement among athletes and fans over the right way to approach this sensitive issue in elite sport.****Daniel Kelly is a Lecturer in Biochemistry, Sheffield Hallam UniversityShare on: WhatsApplast_img read more

England targets double gold in Euro finals

first_img Girls: Sammy Fuller (Roehampton), Lily May Humphreys (Stoke by Nayland), Hollie Muse (West Lancashire), Emily Price (Cleobury Mortimer), Bel Wardle (Prestbury) and Amelia Williamson (Royal Cromer). The full teams are:  The full teams are:  Boys: Toby Briggs (Dunston Hall), Angus Flanagan (St George’s Hill), Harry Goddard (Hanbury Manor), Ben Jones (Northamptonshire County), Robin Williams (Peterborough Milton) and Charlie Strickland (Ham Manor) The men’s team is made up of six major amateur champions and they showed their class by closing out today’s semi-final, with an unbeaten performance. Despite the remarkable score lin the match was close with four of the games going to the 18th and two finishing on the 17th. Only Matthew Jordan (image copyright Leaderboard Photography) had the luxury of a comfortable singles win, finishing on the 15th.  The boys, who are playing for place at La Manga, Spain, were beaten 3-2 by France in yet another very close battle. Three of the games finished on the 18th and two on the 17th with Charlie Strickland and Toby Briggs providing England’s points. Tomorrow they play Germany.  Team coach Graham Walker commented: “We have had a fantastic day, the boys played very, very well, controlled the ball well and we absolutely whitewashed them.”  Meanwhile the England girls will meet France tomorrow in the play-off for the bronze medal after they were beaten 4.5-2.5 by Italy. Men: Harry Ellis (Meon Valley), Scott Gregory (Corhampton), Josh Hilleard (Farrington Park), Matthew Jordan (Royal Liverpool), Gian-Marco Petrozzi (Trentham) and Alfie Plant (Sundridge Park). “There’s only one thing on our minds now and that’s to get this group of girls the right colour medal – the gold.”  Men: Harry Ellis (Meon Valley), Scott Gregory (Corhampton), Josh Hilleard (Farrington Park), Matthew Jordan (Royal Liverpool), Gian-Marco Petrozzi (Trentham) and Alfie Plant (Sundridge Park). England will be targeting a gold medal double tomorrow when both the men’s and women’s sides aim for glory in the finals of the European team championships.  The men, playing in Austria, earned their place with an unbeaten 6.5-0.5 win over Italy and will now play Spain in the final.center_img The girls, playing in Finland, made a great start to their match when they won both foursomes, thanks to the pairings of Sammy Fuller and Hollie Muse and of Lily May Humphreys and Amelia Williamson. But Italy fought back to win four singles, two of which finished on the 18th.  If the men’s game was closely contested, the women’s was even tighter with Sophie Lamb going to the 20th twice – and securing both points. In the morning, she and Gemma Clews kept England on level terms with their hard-won foursomes point. Then, in the afternoon Lamb took England over the line with her singles win.  Click here for full scores Women: Lianna Bailey (Kirby Muxloe), Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest), India Clyburn (Woodhall Spa), Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted) Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe), Rochelle Morris (Woodsome Hall).  Alice Hewson and India Clyburn also won their singles, while Clews’ game was scored a half.  Team coach Steve Robinson said: “The girls all played their part, dug in and grafted – and it was a great performance. We are really happy to be in the final and to have another go. The women, who are defending champions, beat Sweden 4.5-2.5 in Portugal and will take on Italy in the battle for gold.  Girls: Sammy Fuller (Roehampton), Lily May Humphreys (Stoke by Nayland), Hollie Muse (West Lancashire), Emily Price (Cleobury Mortimer), Bel Wardle (Prestbury) and Amelia Williamson (Royal Cromer). 14 Jul 2017 England targets double gold in Euro finals Women: Lianna Bailey (Kirby Muxloe), Gemma Clews (Delamere Forest), India Clyburn (Woodhall Spa), Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted) Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe), Rochelle Morris (Woodsome Hall).  Boys: Toby Briggs (Dunston Hall), Angus Flanagan (St George’s Hill), Harry Goddard (Hanbury Manor), Ben Jones (Northamptonshire County), Robin Williams (Peterborough Milton) and Charlie Strickland (Ham Manor).last_img read more