Messi fails to show up for Barca training

first_imgThe six-times world player of the year insists he has a clause in his contract that allows him to leave on a free transfer — a claim disputed by Barcelona and La Liga.Messi’s lawyers plan to invoke a clause in his four-year contract, signed in 2017, which would have allowed the forward to leave the club for free if he had requested it by June 10.They will argue that date — nominally the end of the season — is now irrelevant after the coronavirus pandemic forced an extension of the La Liga season deep into August.However, La Liga said on Sunday that the only way a club can sign the Argentine forward is if he triggers a release clause of 700 million euros ($836 million). Messi’s decision came after Barcelona failed to win any silverware last season, which finished with a humiliating 8-2 defeat to Bayern Munich in the Champions League quarter-finals.Supporters who waited outside the training ground on Monday were split over Messi’s decision.”I really want Messi to stay,” Brazilian Fabio Alfredo Suarez told Reuters. “Messi lives in my heart — it’s a pity that he leaves, I wanted him to leave through the front door of the club.”Spaniard Ivan Antolin Beltran remembered that Barca had helped Messi through the earlier stages of his career.”After all that Barca has given to Messi throughout his career, which started here as a child… they paid him for all his medicines and everything … I think his way of behaving is a bit incorrect,” he said.  Unhappy Lionel Messi missed Barcelona’s first training session of the new season on Monday, days after his shock announcement that he wants to leave the only club he has played for professionally.Messi’s failure to show up for the session, the first under new Barcelona coach Ronald Koeman, was widely expected after the 33-year-old Argentine also failed to show up for a pre-season medical on Sunday.Reuters television footage showed players arriving for the session which began at 1730 local time (1530 GMT) and Messi did not appear.center_img Topics :last_img read more

EC’s Long-Term Investment Funds should adopt ‘comply or explain’ on SRI

first_imgThe European Commission should require asset managers launching European Long-Term Investment Funds (ELTIF) to disclose the social impact of all investments, asset manager Mirova has suggested.Gwenola Chambon, head of infrastructure funds at the Natixis Asset Management subsidiary, said she was “amazed” there seemed to be little interest in enshrining the notion of fostering socially and environmentally sustainable growth as part of ELTIFs’ investment goals, despite the responsible investment (RI) emphasis of the Commission’s Green Paper on Long-Term Investing.She told IPE all parties involved in the development of ELTIFs at first seemed “very enthusiastic” about the inclusion of an RI emphasis.“Now we have ended up with something that is clearly a long-term investment tool, but does not anymore have anything related to that aspect, which is to me very surprising,” she said.  “We end up with a European tool that is there to foster the economy, there to channel long-term funds, yet has nothing to say on that aspect [sustainable investment], which is too bad.”The initial legislative proposal for the ELTIF regulation, published in June last year, noted that “sustainable, smart and inclusive growth” was key to fostering European economic growth less susceptible to systemic risks.Chambon said the least the industry should expect from the Commission was for the regulation to be amended to include a requirement for asset managers launching ELTIFs to disclose their approach to socially responsible investment.“Any asset manager should at least explain how he wants to commit through that tool to social and responsible investment responsibilities – whether it has no particular objective, or whether it has – and if it has, to be very concrete on what it wants to do and what it wants to implement,” she said.She said infrastructure, and particularly social housing, were assets forming the building blocks of a society.“We are creating assets that will have an impact on several generations,” she said. “We can’t afford not to think about the social and responsible impact on our environment and the economy in general.”PensionsEurope has previously suggested the European Investment Bank should offer both capital guarantees and its own expertise to assessing infrastructure projects backed by ELTIFs.last_img read more