In England, women bishops legislation remains intact

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Protestors in favor of women bishops gathered in July 2006 on the campus of York University before the debate began on a motion that addressed the process of ordaining women to the episcopate. ENS Photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] The Church of England‘s General Synod, meeting Feb. 6-9 in London, has rejected a bid to provide greater concessions for those opposed to women bishops. A final vote on the legislation that will enable women to become bishops is expected to come before synod in July.The Manchester Diocesan Synod Motion, introduced in September 2011 and backed by the archbishops of Canterbury and York, would have supported amending a draft measure to enable two bishops to exercise episcopal functions within the same jurisdiction by way of “co-ordinating” their ministries.The same amendment was rejected 18 months earlier when in July 2010 General Synod backed the currently unaltered measure that paves the way for women to become bishops, a setback for traditionalists who had hoped for more robust provisions for those in opposition. Some supporters of women bishops feared the Manchester Motion would force women bishops to accept limitations on their authority.During the past 18 months the legislation supporting women bishops has been given the nod by 42 of the 44 diocesan synods throughout England, but it now requires a two-thirds majority in each of the three houses of General Synod – bishops, clergy and laity – for it to be adopted. Before the legislation comes to synod for final approval, likely when it next meets in July, the House of Bishops will have one last chance in May to tweak the text of the draft measure.The text of the Manchester Motion was entirely replaced by the text of an amendment that calls for the women bishops measure to return to synod “substantially unamended,” meaning a woman diocesan bishop would not be obligated to cede any of her episcopal authority to a male alternative.The Rev. Canon Clare Edwards of the Diocese of Canterbury said during a Feb. 8 synod debate that the Manchester motion “would fundamentally change the episcopacy creating a barrier between those on either side. Our Christian identity needs to be in being equally loved sons and daughters of God … I believe we will have nothing to say to our world if we resort to legislation to coexist.”The Rev. Canon Kathryn Fitzsimons, from the Diocese of Ripon and Leeds, reminded synod of the Feb. 7 address from Sally Keeble, director of the Anglican Alliance, in which they heard about the value of empowering women throughout the Anglican Communion. “Let’s not let our statement of public policy let down women throughout the communion,” she said, urging them to reject the Manchester motion.Motions identical to the one proposed by Manchester were passed by four other diocesan synods.The Diocese of Wakefield supported the Manchester motion “even though a majority are in support of women bishops,” said the Rev. Paul Cartwright. “I think this is a lesson to learn. Today’s business could be a make or break for the Church of England. We need to ensure that we care for those who do not support women bishops … We need to work for a win-win situation and one way we can do this is to support the Manchester motion in tact and unchanged.”Archbishop of York John Sentamu reaffirmed Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams’ earlier plea that “all desire to proceed in a way that would maintain the highest degree of communion,” and that the Manchester motion would provide an opportunity to accomplish that goal.Bishop Michael Perham of Gloucester, who received the loudest and longest applause throughout the three-hour debate, disagreed. He explained that the current draft measure unamended already represents “a huge sacrifice by the supporters of women bishops. The draft legislation is a huge compromise. It is the middle way … The last thing we want is for the legislation to go down at the last moment. Supporters of women in the episcopate won’t be able to vote for the [amended] legislation. Manchester ties everyone’s hands unhelpfully… and it is not the way forward.”Christina Rees, a lay member from St. Albans and former chair of women-bishop advocacy group Women and the Church, or WATCH, said that passing the Manchester motion amendment would send the message that “we are a church that has said yes to women bishops, but in law they are not quite the same as their male counterparts. At a stroke passing this … motion [creates] a two-tier episcopate.”Anne Foreman, a lay member from the Diocese of Exeter, also urged synod to reject the motion because it would further delay the appointment of women bishops, restrict their role and authority “and it will change what the dioceses have voted for.”But Emma Forward, a lay member also from the Diocese of Exeter, described herself as “a young Anglo-Catholic who cannot in conscience accept women bishops … We’re relying on this amendment to pass” she said, describing it as “our best chance to have a future in the Church of England.”A measure is a piece of legislation that, once passed by the General Synod, requires approval by the U.K. Parliament. Parliamentary approval is necessary because the measure effectively changes English law as the Church of England is an officially established Christian church with Queen Elizabeth II as its supreme governor. Assuming all stages of the legislative process proceed without delay, the first woman bishop could not be consecrated in England until at least 2014.According to the Church of England’s constitution, only the House of Bishops has the authority to alter any measure because of the implications it has on English law. Any debate in the General Synod, therefore, is simply advisory.Only if the legislation is “substantially” amended, would it need to be referred back to the dioceses for approval, thus delaying the process by a further 12-18 months. The decision on what determines a “substantial” amendment, falls to a committee of six people – appropriately named the “Group of Six” – made up of the presidents and prolocutors of the Convocations of Canterbury and York, and the chair and vice chair of the House of Laity.History of women’s ordained ministryThe General Synod began its steady course toward allowing women in the episcopate when in July 2005 it passed a motion to remove the legal obstacles to ordaining women bishops.In July 2006, synod called for the practical and legislative arrangements of admitting women to the episcopate to be explored. It also called for the formation of a legislative drafting group to prepare a draft measure and amending canon necessary to remove the legal obstacles.At its July 2008 group of sessions, synod agreed that it was the “wish of its majority … for women to be admitted to the episcopate” and affirmed that “special arrangements be available, within the existing structures of the Church of England, for those who as a matter of theological conviction will not be able to receive the ministry of women as bishops or priests.”General Synod voted in February 2009 to send a draft measure on women bishops to a revision committee so it could rework the legislation.The revision committee met 16 times beginning in May 2009 and considered 114 submissions from synod members, and a further 183 submissions from others. In May 2010, the committee published its 142-page report, which offered a detailed analysis of the draft legislation in time for the July 2010 synod debate and vote.The long path towards accepting women’s ordained ministry in the Anglican Communion began in 1920 when the Lambeth Conference called (via Resolutions 47-52) for the diaconate of women to be restored “formally and canonically,” adding that it should be recognized throughout the communion.The first woman priest in the communion, Li Tim-Oi, was ordained in Hong Kong in 1944. Due to outside pressure she resigned her license, but not her holy orders, following World War II. In 1971, the Rev. Jane Hwang and the Rev. Joyce Bennett were ordained priests in the Diocese of Hong Kong, though their ministries were not recognized in many parts of the Anglican Communion.In 1974, there was an “irregular” ordination of 11 women in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, which officially authorized women’s priestly ordination two years later.Bishop Barbara Harris, now retired suffragan of Massachusetts, was elected in 1988 and became the Anglican Communion’s first woman bishop after her consecration and ordination in 1989.The Rt. Rev. Penelope Jamieson made history in 1989 when she was elected as bishop of the Diocese of Dunedin, New Zealand, and became the first woman to serve as a diocesan bishop in the Anglican Communion.The Rt. Rev. Mary Adelia McLeod, who was ordained a priest in 1980, was consecrated in 1993 as bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, becoming the first woman diocesan bishop in the U.S.-based Episcopal Church. She retired in 2001.The Rt. Rev. Canon Nerva Cot Aguilera became the first woman Anglican bishop in Latin America when she was consecrated bishop suffragan of the Episcopal Church of Cuba in June 2007.The Church of England opened the priesthood to women in November 1992, five years after women were first ordained to the diaconate. More than 5,000 women have been ordained as priests in England since 1994 and today they represent nearly 40 percent of all clergy.The General Synod is the national assembly of the Church of England which came into being in 1970 replacing an earlier body known as the Church Assembly. It continues a tradition of synodical government which, in England, has its origins in the medieval period.— Matthew Davies is editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In England, women bishops legislation remains intact Synod expected to take final vote in July The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA By Matthew DaviesPosted Feb 9, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Women’s Ministry Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

El Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife® supera el objetivo para combatir…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Posted Mar 18, 2013 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Relief & Development, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Health & Healthcare Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel El Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife® supera el objetivo para combatir la malaria AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [La Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo] El Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife® ha superado con éxito su objetivo de 5 millones de dólares debido a la increíble generosidad de los colaboradores de toda la Iglesia Episcopal y personas externas a la organización. Durante el trienio 2010-2012, miles de personas se unieron a congregaciones, diócesis, escuelas y organizaciones en esta iniciativa de base que abarca a toda la iglesia y busca unir a los episcopales en la lucha contra la malaria. Desde 2006, la asociación del programa NetsforLife® de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ha distribuido más de 11 millones de mosquiteros y reducido las muertes relacionadas con la malaria en un 45% en las comunidades del África sahariana que participan del programa.“El hecho de haber recaudado 5 millones de dólares, a nivel base, a través del trabajo conjunto de las comunidades de la iglesia es muy significativo”, dijo Laura Ellen Muglia, copresidente del Comité Asesor de la Campaña nacional del Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife®. “Aún más impactante es saber que los mosquiteros distribuidos harán que niños, madres, padres, abuelos, primos y comunidades enteras tengan una vida sin malaria, una nueva vida con muchas posibilidades, una vida de esperanza”.Mediante su labor conjunta con iglesias y grupos religiosos, NetsforLife® ha sido líder en la prevención de la malaria: distribuyó más de 11 millones de mosquiteros, capacitó a 82,000 agentes comunitarios de malaria y llegó a más de 30 millones de personas en zonas remotas de todo el continente africano. NetsforLife® combate la malaria con educar a los miembros de la comunidad sobre el uso y el mantenimiento adecuados de los mosquiteros, capacitar a los agentes comunitarios para la entrega de dichos mosquiteros, que salvan vidas, y evaluar las prácticas de prevención de la malaria. De los 17 países en los que NetsforLife® se encuentra activo, cinco de ellos (Angola, Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leona y Zambia) han incorporado diversos aspectos de la metodología del programa a su política nacional de lucha contra la malaria; y muchos otros han solicitado asesoramiento para la planificación estratégica a nivel nacional.En la Convención General de 2009, la Iglesia Episcopal hizo el Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife® la pieza central de su respuesta profética a los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio (ODM) de las Naciones Unidas y se comprometió a destinar el 0,7% de su presupuesto a esta campaña. Se invitó a todos los episcopales a aprender más sobre esta enfermedad y las formas de prevenirla, y a colaborar con esta importante tarea. Un Comité Asesor integrado por cuatro copresidentes y miembros de toda la Iglesia se encarga de dirigir la campaña, que superó su objetivo de recaudación de 5 millones de dólares a principios de 2013.“No se me ocurre ninguna otra iniciativa individual que haya unido tanto a nuestra diócesis en una misión y un esfuerzo común. La campaña proporcionó un enfoque renovado en la labor de los ODM y reunió individuos de sorprendente talento y liderazgo de pequeñas y grandes parroquias”, reflexionó el Reverendísimo Michael Curry, Obispo de la Diócesis Episcopal de Carolina del Norte, copresidente del Comité Asesor de la Campaña nacional del Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife® y Miembro de la Junta Directiva de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo. “El trabajo de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ocupa un lugar central en nuestro llamado como cristianos a curar a un mundo que sufre”.El Fondo de Inspiración de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo permite a los episcopales vivir su fe al marcar una diferencia positiva en las vidas de millones de personas del mundo entero a través de la participación local y de base en comunidades de todo el país.“Fue muy conmovedor ver la forma en que las iglesias y diócesis episcopales se unieron para mejorar significativamente la vida de millones de personas del África subsahariana a través del trabajo de NetsforLife® y esta campaña”, manifestó Barbara Case Senchak, copresidente del Comité Asesor de la Campaña nacional del Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife®. “Todas nuestras comunidades se fortalecieron gracias a esta iniciativa. Realmente representa la participación de lo mejor de la cristiandad en un esfuerzo global”.Si bien la campaña ha finalizado, la labor de NetsforLife® continuará. De hecho, los logros alcanzados en la lucha contra la malaria son aún frágiles y requerirán una inversión permanente. Para el 2013, el objetivo es distribuir más de 3 millones de mosquiteros.“La pasión, la creatividad y el entusiasmo que toda la Iglesia le aportó a esta campaña ha sido algo poco menos que extraordinario”, afirmó Joy Shigaki, Directora del Fondo de Inspiración NetsforLife®. “Mediante la organización de torneos de baloncesto, carreras, ventas de galletas y foros educativos sobre la malaria, esta campaña ha constituido una iniciativa vivificante y transformadora”.Vea nuestro video de agradecimiento y lea relatos inspiradores de la campaña:“Thank You” VideoEpiscopal Diocese of New JerseyEpiscopal Diocese of ChicagoEpiscopal Diocese of MichiganEpiscopal Diocese of Southern Ohio La Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo es la agencia internacional de ayuda y desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal y una organización 501(c)(3) independiente. La agencia sigue el mandato de Jesús en Mateo 25. Sus programas buscan alcanzar las Metas de Desarrollo del Milenio. La Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo trabaja en estrecha colaboración con la Iglesia a nivel mundial y los socios ecuménicos para ayudar a reconstruir sitios que han sufrido catástrofes y a fortalecer a las comunidades locales para que puedan encontrar soluciones duraderas que combatan la pobreza, el hambre y las enfermedades, incluidos el VIH/SIDA y la malaria. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

New theological school launched by 4 Midwestern dioceses

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing October 1, 2013 at 9:39 pm I myself was seminary trained, and did some STM pre work beyond. After thirteen years of full time ministry, I was inactive for a couple of years. For the last thirty I have been doing bi-vocational work. I must say… I hold my hat to the local priests in the area. For a time, I was teaching Bible and church history in a local school. We poured it on! They learned. And I am glad to serve as a fellow worker in the vineyard with the rigorously trained local clergy. Rector Shreveport, LA November 21, 2013 at 9:25 pm I’m beginning to see that the opposite is becoming true. people with the general of moving experience is enhancing the theological learning experience. As lay persons in the field already, these learners are broadening the mutual learning of one another in a very respectful environment. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Bob Griffith says: October 1, 2013 at 4:36 pm My questions is whether there will now develop, or rather the rate will increase, of two classes of clerics – those who are seminary trained and those who are not? I understand that we are running out of money, yet… I don’t find this a viable and long term solution, unless we think providing a less-educated class of clergy for our congregations will actually help even small congregations thrive beyond our current circumstances – or the dumbing-down of clerical “profession” is the acceptable outcome. October 2, 2013 at 9:08 am I am a VTS graduate with 30 + years in the ministry. I welcome this step forward. I think it will bring us clergy with a vision that will enhance our theological and pastoral response to the world. I have20 + years that in a parish blessed with seminary interns many who suffered from an ivory tower set apart vision of the church, they need some of the in the world understanding of how to join the teachings of the church and the living of the faith. Byron Banks says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET November 2, 2013 at 2:41 am “Dumbing Down” is what goes on in “government” schools. This reminds me of internship which produces persons who actually want to be in the chosen profession. Kindness and compassion can’t be taught. Comments are closed. The Rev. Canon Robyn Szoke-Coolidge says: Tony Green says: November 21, 2013 at 9:31 pm CORRECTION: (People are bringing a broad range of experience to this type of learning — enhancing….) The Rev. Rob Baldwin, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Lawrence, Kansas, uses a milking stool to illustrate the “three-legged stool” of Anglican theology during a class on Anglican identity for students at the Bishop Kemper School for Ministry. Photo/Melodie Woerman[Episcopal Diocese of Kansas] Class is now in session for the Bishop Kemper School for Ministry, the newly created school that provides theological education to students from the dioceses of Kansas, West Missouri, Nebraska and Western Kansas. The school’s first group of students, 35 people from all four dioceses, met for the first time Aug. 10-11 in Topeka.To celebrate the school’s creation, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori will be in Topeka on Oct. 5. She will speak at a public forum on the emerging shape of the church and the changing face of ministry. She then will officiate at a service to mark the school’s opening and dedicate school facilities, and she will greet people at a public reception.The school is named for Bishop Jackson Kemper, the first missionary bishop of the Episcopal Church, who was the organizing bishop when each of the four dioceses was founded in the 19th century. He also was committed to the value of local theological education for the growth and health of the Episcopal Church.The school was formed from existing diocesan programs to provide a high quality theological education for people preparing for ordination and for lay leaders in congregations, all without having to head off to a traditional seminary, where costs can run more than $30,000 a year.And for the bishops of the partner dioceses, it provides something critical – the ability to provide pastoral and sacramental leadership for their congregations.Nebraska Bishop J. Scott Barker said the school “is an answered prayer” for his diocese, in part because the curriculum addresses “the uniqueness of the church in the Midwest,” which includes lots of smaller congregations in cities and towns that are miles apart.Kansas Bishop Dean Wolfe said the school’s goal is to develop “visionary leaders, faithful leaders, courageous leaders” for congregations, no matter the diocese in which they are located.West Missouri Bishop Martin Field said the school will provide “well-prepared and able” clergy for congregations that aren’t able to afford the cost of a seminary-trained priest. It also will prompt those congregations to identify natural leaders in their midst to send to the school, he said.Western Kansas Bishop Michael Milliken called his diocese a “rural/frontier area” made up of very small congregations. This school is “one of the few ways available for a great theological education” for leaders in those churches, he said.Field added, “I am as excited about this project as I’ve ever been about any project to engage the church for its betterment.”Exploring the nature of ministryThe school’s dean, the Rev. Andrew Grosso, said that the benefit of having four diocesan partners is that together they “take seriously the emerging missional character of ministry in today’s church.” As the school’s structure was being decided, he said some fundamental issues – the nature of ministry and the shape of the church – became very important.He said, “‘How do you form a priest?’ implies you are asking ‘What does Christian ministry in today’s church look like?’ It’s all part of a larger context.”Sending bivocational and nonstipendiary clergy into congregations only makes sense if lay people understand they are part of the ministry in that place, he said. One of the school’s purposes will be “empowering and inspiring more people to engage in more forms of ministry.”Initial efforts have centered on a curriculum for the ordination track, since the four dioceses had people ready to start those studies. But Grosso said classes also will equip lay leaders to be catechists, evangelists, youth minsters, parish administrators, outreach ministers, worship leaders and lay preachers, among other ministries.A high quality educationWhile the school is new, most of the students are returning for a second or third year. The program for priests runs three years and for deacons, two. Each diocese sets its own criteria for who can enroll in the school.Charles Everson, a first-year priesthood student from the Diocese of Kansas, discovered quickly that the courses are thought-provoking. After just two weekends of classes he said, “I have a challenging and exciting road ahead of me for the next three years!”Bruce Bower is a second-year student from the Diocese of West Missouri preparing to be a deacon. He called the courses “rigorous” and the instructors “top notch.” He said that attending the Bishop Kemper School “doesn’t mean the students have to settle for a theological education that is somehow less than we might receive elsewhere.”The Rev. Carolyn Ballinger is a third-year priesthood student from the Diocese of Western Kansas who was ordained a transitional deacon in May. She said the courses she has taken “exceed the offerings and demands” she had when earning a Ph.D.But beyond the quality of instruction, students praised the community that is formed among them. Ballinger said that after spending a weekend a month living, eating, learning and praying together, she and others stay in touch outside of class, “asking, giving and receiving friendship and encouragement.”Bower said a friend of his attends a traditional Episcopal seminary and “expresses envy about how BKSM students have so much interaction together, and how we are able to grow in relationships.”Everson said the local aspect of the school is critically important. “There are many men and women called to ordained ministry … for whom a formal seminary degree is not a viable option.”Alison Black, a second-year priest student from the Diocese of Kansas, said, “Being a stay-at-home mom to three small children, there is no way that I could attend a traditional seminary anytime in the near future.” Ballinger said that the local setting makes theological education accessible to people from “any social class, age group, level of financial influence, and cultural or ethnic background.”A unique structureGrosso said he believes the school’s structure is the only one of its kind in the Episcopal Church. The Bishop Kemper School for Ministry is a non-profit corporation operated jointly by the four dioceses.The desire for a different model for the school developed in the past year, as students from Western Kansas, West Missouri and Nebraska attended the Kansas School for Ministry. The four bishops soon saw the need for a school that was jointly owned, to allow it to grow beyond what a single diocese could provide. The Kansas school and other diocesan educational programs merged into the Bishop Kemper School.Each of the dioceses makes a financial contribution to the school’s operations. Tuition from students also helps fund the school’s budget, including a salary for the dean, faculty stipends and reimbursement for facilities the school uses.The board, including the four ex officio bishops, is responsible for overseeing the life of the school, as well as the work of the dean and faculty.Ten months of classesBishop Kemper School students come to Topeka once a month for 10 months and take one course per weekend. Classes during the current academic year include biblical studies, ministry, theology, Anglicanism, spirituality, church history and ethics.Faculty members are drawn from the four dioceses and include instructors with special expertise in a field. Many are ordained clergy.Students also participate in informal sessions with experienced clergy to explore real-world, practical applications of what they are learning. They also take turns leading worship services and preaching.The cost for ordination-track students is $1,800 a year, and the school suggests it be shared equally between the student, and the student’s parish and diocese.Part of a trendThe Bishop Kemper School isn’t the only multi-diocese educational program in the Episcopal Church. Another is the Iona Initiative, whose structure is different from the Bishop Kemper School. It is based on the Iona School in the Diocese of Texas but now operates under the auspices of the Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas.The initiative, which is in the second year of a three-year pilot program, includes Texas and seven other dioceses.Once a month for 10 months, students gather for a weekend in their own diocese where they receive instruction via videos and voice-over PowerPoint presentations that were developed by seminary faculty. Local teachers guide the video courses and teach the practical aspects of the program, such as how to lead worship. It currently provides education only for those seeking ordination as deacons and nonstipendiary priests.Mary MacGregor, who heads the diocese’s Iona School, said programs like theirs and the Bishop Kemper School are what the church needs. She noted that in the Diocese of Wyoming, one of the Iona partners, 90 percent of their priests are bivocational. And the need for local education programs will only grow, she said.“This is the movement that is going on in the church. There will be more internal schools in the Episcopal Church,” she said. And while quality content is essential, it isn’t the only requirement, she said. “We have to have a mix of quality, accessibility and do-ability.”— Melodie Woerman is director of communications for the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Theological Education The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Mary S. Janda says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS October 5, 2013 at 8:04 pm “Milking stool” and “emerging missional character”: how does that appeal to and relate to latte-drinking, i-pad-using 20 & 30 year olds? What about interactive learning across the country and countries? Tony Green says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 October 2, 2013 at 12:51 am We have pretty much the same system in the Church of England. There is a course called STETS which covers my diocese and several others which is based at Sarum College. It works very well, and trains people to a high standard. It doesn’t train people to as high a standard as the highest you can achieve at a seminary, but then again, not everyone who goes to seminary has the desire or capacity to achieve the highest standards. In reality, many seminary trained priests leave seminary with the same level of theological education as the average STETS student. Protecting the future of scholar priests and insisting that there should be more of them is an important priority for the Church. Nevertheless, not every priest needs to be a PhD. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York October 1, 2013 at 6:42 pm As a clergy person that went thru this type of school, I am sick and tired of people saying that we are 2nd or 3rd class clergy. In the eye of the church if you would care to read the canons we are all the same. Also the one of us that have worked outside the church also bring in life long knowledge that some if not all the seminary trained clergy dont have. And somme of us have taken it on your selfs to go and take a class or two at a seminary when we can. So in the future please know what you are talking about. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New theological school launched by 4 Midwestern dioceses Comments (12) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT October 1, 2013 at 5:02 pm Dear Bob,As an Episcopal priest who went through a similar “local” seminary experience, I can assure you that this is not a “dumbing down” of priests. I agree that there are people who view this as 2nd-class or even 3rd class, but they are passing judgment without even giving the person a chance. If I were you, I would try and talk with the leaders of this type of seminary and get engaged. Just a thought . . . Rev. Randy McIntosh says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Father Les Singleton says: Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC The Very Rev. Stuart Schadt says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 November 21, 2013 at 9:38 pm (An important, emerging distinction, as the term, “Anglican,” for good or bad, is meaning very different things to different people Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI October 2, 2013 at 12:48 pm What great opportunities for integration of practical theology with academic rigor as new diocesan educational systems develop for vocational formation. I am seminary trained with over 25 years experience now developing a new vision, offered and supported by our Bishop, in our diocesan School of Christian Studies. This new version of SCS includes formational/educational/instructional opportunities that integrates 8 weeks of on line learning and reflecting through cohort groups with two three day experiences; one in the beginning of class the second at the end, in order to be in face to face community for discernment and learning. What we are learning is that by developing an excellent faculty who are able to educate, instruct and are in formational relationship through technology , as well as in face to face community, our students are being prepared for an understanding of mission and ministry in the emerging church in a way that allows technology to support and enhance faith development and faith formation. Our plan is to integrate our opportunities with Episcopal seminary offerings to deepen and enhance Anglican identity. A both/and approach, with a majority of the work done locally. I look forward to learning more from other diocese, as we continue to evaluate our vocational work in preparing strong and healthy leaders By Melodie WoermanPosted Oct 1, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tony Green says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Jay Woods says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Barnaby Perkins says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Church of Pakistan forges new links with China

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Church of Pakistan forges new links with China Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Asia, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Members of the first Church of Pakistan delegation to ChinaPhoto: Church of Pakistan[Anglican Communion News Service] A new link between the Church of Pakistan and Christians in China started last month with the very first visit to the neighboring country by an official delegation led by the Moderator of the Pakistan church.Bishop Samuel Azariah, along with eight representatives from Pakistan, met with Christians of the People’s Republic of China from May 16-26 following an invitation from the China Christian Council, through its vice president and general secretary, the Rev. Baoping Kan. The two leaders serve together on the Executive Committee of the World Council of Churches.“As the Church of Pakistan this was the first step in the history of the church to establish a relationship of our own with a church in the East,” said Azariah.“We wanted to reach out and see the changes in China and as good neighbors we want our churches to develop good cooperation.”Although the countries are close and many people now fly in and out of China, he said the churches have never used that fact to their advantage.“This is not only a breakthrough of a new relationship but an opportunity of learning for both churches on mission, self-reliance and development,” said Azariah.“We see China as a church which has developed its confidence recently on its own with its own resources. We believe that is something we can learn from and we hope that we as the Church of Pakistan can achieve self-reliance just as they have done.”The churches in China are celebrating a post-denominational period, as there are no official church denominations. The Three Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM) caters to the pastoral needs of the churches and its members, and for administrative purposes the China Christian Council, both at the national and provincial levels, takes care of international relations and administration.Azariah hopes the visit will develop a relationship of love and prayer, caring and sharing, a joint Christian witness. “We can see the importance of how we can cooperate in terms of mission and in joint ventures in sharing the gospel, leadership training and theological education. We are looking forward to receiving a delegation from China in the next 6 or 7 months and further ahead we would like to develop exchanges with pastors, youth leaders, women’s ministry leaders and others.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Ecumenical & Interreligious By Rachel FarmerPosted Jun 7, 2016 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

Little church hosts big ministry with free lunches in Minnesota

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET CAROLYN MARKSON says: Rector Belleville, IL Poverty & Hunger Rector Bath, NC Little church hosts big ministry with free lunches in Minnesota Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem David Paulsen says: February 9, 2017 at 1:34 pm The lunches draw a mix of church members, non-Episcopalians from the community and also visits from residents of two local group homes. It’s a ministry like other churches’ ministries, except that it happens to draw a crowd disproportionately large compared to the this church’s aging membership. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 9, 2017 at 8:11 pm For the folks living in the group homes, this gives them something to look forward to each month. Truly a valuable ministry to people forgotten and ignored by society. Well done! Tony Oberdorfer says: Kilty Maoris says: Comments (15) February 9, 2017 at 7:37 pm My church does this once a year. I can’t imagine doing it once a month! I think it’s a wonderful ministry and hope it goes on for a good many more years. I wish you all the best. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT February 9, 2017 at 9:40 pm Sorry you feel that way. I have been ordained for 25 years and feel quite real. Rather like the Velveteen Rabbit. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tony Oberdorfer says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release February 9, 2017 at 4:56 pm This church also supports other outreach projects. This is just one but it is a humdinger. They also collaborate with other like minded churches during special services during Advent and Lent. It is a joy to serve this small but lively congregation. Pamela Payne says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 9, 2017 at 7:55 pm Thank you for being Christ’s hands in the world. What an amazing ministry. You bring joy to others, while you also grow spiritually and enjoy fellowship. How wonderful!”We are one in the Spirit”! The Rev’d Paul Gill Rider says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Judy Erwin says: February 10, 2017 at 2:32 pm I apologize if I inadvertently gave the impression that I am in principle against such outreach programs as Trinity’s free dinner. My own church in Boston hosts a dinner each Tuesday requiring considerable effort intended largely for local down-and-outers virtually none of whom attend church on Sunday. The point I was clumsily trying to make is simply that too many churches these days see their mission as primarily one of social welfare (that’s particularly true in left-wingish Massachusetts) and their main job of tending to the spiritual needs of parishioners is often almost lost in the process. Perhaps things are different in Litchfield, I send Trinity my best wishes. The Rev. Brian Chace says: Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Kay Amelia Bell says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books February 9, 2017 at 7:49 pm Congratulations, Trinity. Well done. Keep up your good work. Our “little” church is All Saints’, Pontiac, Michigan. Our Sunday attendance is about 80. We serve a free breakfast every Saturday morning to 120-140 very hungry folks from inner-city Pontiac. Hard work, but we get back so much more than we give. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rev Judy Hoover says: February 9, 2017 at 1:24 pm Is a monthly free lunch the best thing this church has to offer? I’m afraid that if Trinity can attract only about 15 of its 100 members to show up on Sunday morning it has pretty much degenerated into nothing more than a social welfare organization. Featured Events Frank J. Corbishley says: February 9, 2017 at 6:05 pm THANK YOU FOR SOME GOOD NEWS!! I believe your monthly free lunch is a grand outreach, obviously enjoyed and used by the community, which is our mission: love our Lord and our neighbor!! February 9, 2017 at 5:33 pm Wow. Just. Wow. February 9, 2017 at 8:39 pm Absolutely right! Small size…15 people not enough to form a decent altar guild. They should give up and go to a decent church with real priests. February 9, 2017 at 9:02 pm If it takes the supply priests an hour to get to Litchfield, I wonder how far away the closest “decent church with real priests” is. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 9, 2017 at 5:34 pm I think that it is wonderful that such a small congregation is still able to make a valuable contribution to the community…in this case, size does not matter!! Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rev Judy Hoover says: Melanie Barbarito says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm What a lovely ministry for the community. I’m sure that the presence of God is felt in a very real way as neighbors share a meal. Hm. That reminds me of something . . . Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Trinity Episcopal Church in Litchfield, Minnesota, hosts a free lunch every last Friday of the month, drawing more than 100 people to this small parish. Photo: Jane Settergren[Episcopal News Service] As an outpost of the Episcopal Church in a small Midwestern community, Trinity Episcopal would easily be overlooked if not for an unlikely success story that is told once a month through food and fellowship.Even the most active members of this parish in Litchfield, Minnesota, population 6,726, openly describe the congregation as “pretty small,” “fairly small” and “little.” The church, on its profile page on the Episcopal Church’s website, calls itself as “a small but lively parish.”Trinity Episcopal Church’s building in Litchfield, Minnesota, was built in 1871.Its roots date back to 1871, with the construction of the church building that still is used for worship every Sunday morning. In recent years, the congregation’s membership has shifted older while diminishing in size to about 100. Attendance has dwindled even further, typically about 15 members at services that are led by a rotating lineup of supply priests who travel more than an hour west to Litchfield from the Twin Cities.But visit Trinity Episcopal at lunchtime on the last Friday of any month, and you’ll find the congregation seeming to swell to several times its size, as members of the community pour in for the parish’s monthly free lunch and fellowship time.“Everybody’s very proud of what we do and very thankful that we’re able to do it,” senior warden Dennis Rutledge said, estimating that the free lunches draw more than 100 people to the church each month. “We’re a fairly small congregation, but this is the best way for us to be effective and do the things we can do.”The free lunch is the most prominent example of the outreach underway at Trinity, which has money from gifts set aside to support other social ministries, said the Rev. Judy Hoover, one of the supply priests who travel to Litchfield.“Everyone at that parish has a job, and they work really well together. They’re really kind of unique,” said Hoover, 83, who lives in Plymouth, Minnesota.Once in a while, Rutledge said, he’ll raise the question of whether the church should keep organizing the monthly free lunches. No one, apparently, takes the question seriously, perhaps including Rutledge himself.“I’ve been almost shouted down – ‘Of course, we’re going to do this!’” he said.The mastermind of each month’s meal is a man named Paul Foley, whose wife, JoAnn, is active in the Episcopal Church Women group. He was raised Roman Catholic but no longer considers himself a churchgoer. About 15 years ago, the church needed a cook to keep the lunches going.“‘Nobody’s willing to take charge,’” Paul remembers his wife telling him. “I said, ‘I will.’”Foley has been cooking since he was a boy growing up in Litchfield. He first learned how to prepare food by shadowing his mother in their kitchen. As an adult, he said he spent some time living in Chicago with friends who, when they discovered his skills at preparing a meal, told him they’d buy the groceries if he cooked.Paul Foley is the meal planner and cook behind most of the free lunches held each month at Trinity Episcopal Church in Litchfield, Minnesota. Photo: Jane SettergrenFoley, now 79, briefly worked later in life as a cook for a hotel and then for a caterer, but mostly he cooks for fun, family and fellowship. The free lunches at Trinity provide the perfect canvas for this culinary artist.“It’s kind of a release,” he said. “I enjoy it so much and then the fact that we’re doing it for these people, and I look out to the opening and I see them out there all happy and visiting. … It makes me feel good.”A typical Friday meal starts on Tuesday, when Foley drive up to St. Cloud to buy the groceries and brings them back to the church kitchen. Wednesday is devoted to prep work, and by Thursday he tries to have as much of the meal done as he can. He finishes off Friday morning by preparing the items that need to be hot and fresh.The congregation and community have come to expect certain menu items at certain times of the year: October’s meal follows a German Oktoberfest theme, Foley said, and November is chow mein, just because people seem to like it. Ham is a must for December.“You get to visit with everybody,” free lunch regular Veronica Caswell told the local Independent Review for a feature story about Trinity’s lunches in January. “Sometimes, you just don’t know what you’re going to cook, so it’s nice to come here,”Hip surgery sidelined Foley in January, so he had to pass the apron that month to family members, but he plans to be back in the kitchen for February’s meal. His two Lenten meals are the same every year: “a tuna recipe everybody loves” and salmon loaf.“If I didn’t make salmon loaf, they’d just come after me,” he said.The menu isn’t the only diversity at the lunches. The meals draw a mix of people from the congregation and the community, including two group homes in the area whose residents suffer from developmental disabilities, church member Jane Settergren said.“Those folks just enjoy it so much,” Settergren said. “We like to see them.”And members of the congregation have gotten used to taking on certain roles every month, she said. One of the men is in charge of brewing the coffee. JoAnn Foley makes sure the bathroom supplies are stocked.“I’m kind of the assistant washer,” Rutledge, the warden, said.Settergren, 71, and others are stationed in the dining room to welcome diners. And one of the women, if she can break from serving the food, will play her cello while the crowd socializes.“We haven’t really made a profit for the last couple years, but that doesn’t worry anybody because that’s not the object,” Paul Foley said. “It’s to get them together and have a good meal.”And they expect to keep serving up the monthly meals at this “super little church,” as Settergren calls it, as long as they are able.“It’s fun. Everybody seems to enjoy it,” she said. “We would miss it terribly if we didn’t do it anymore.”-David Paulsen is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Feb 9, 2017 Peggy Goldsmith says: last_img read more

Preachers offer comfort, challenge and humor in the face of…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA 2017 Hurricanes, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Hurricane Harvey Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 6, 2017 at 5:08 pm This I believe: God understands if you’re worried in the midst of a hurricane, it’s a lie to say that “[God’s] not waking up because he’s growing you up” after Harvey’s wrath, and it is not a divine “compliment” if your circumstances aren’t turning around yet and the “winds are still blowing, the waves are still rocking.” For those who are twitchy about Joel Osteen’s sermon on Sunday, and for those who love it, my sermon in the same City of Houston included these words: “Certain things unfold in the history of the world or in our own personal experiences that cause doubts not only about God’s goodness but also about God’s very existence. And those who rush to God’s defense often make matters worse with hurtful words of false comfort. At times they dishonor God’s holy name more than ecclesiastical outlaws who raise their fists to heaven in moral outrage over innocent suffering.” https://neilwillard.com/2017/09/03/harveys-wrath-the-problem-of-evil/ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (1) Press Release Service Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Neil Alan Willard says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Tags By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 6, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Preachers offer comfort, challenge and humor in the face of Harvey Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL The Rev. James Derkits, rector of Trinity by the Sea Episcopal Church in Port Aransas, Texas, said Sept. 3 that people there were “living out the teaching of Romans.” Photo: Jennifer Wickham via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] Sometimes, it is the simplest words that work the best. That, and some humor.“So.”“Wow.”“What a week.”That is how the Rev. Dr. Russell J. Levenson, Jr., rector of St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston, began his Sept. 3 sermon. Like many preachers faced with the task of bringing the word of God to bear on the experience of Hurricane Harvey, Levenson combined simple comfort laced with humor and biblical interpretation with a call to ministry.When he asked his congregation how they were doing and there was what seemed to be a positive murmuring reply, Levenson said gently, “Yeah, you’re all lying.”He elicited a good laugh.At Trinity by the Sea Episcopal Church in Port Aransas, Texas, near where Harvey first struck on Aug. 25, the Rev. James Derkits described in his sermon a typical conversation.“ ’Hey, how’re you doing?’ ”“ ’Oh, holding up all right.’ ”“And then we cry for a minute. And then we say, ‘OK, back to work.’ ”“We’re just going to keep on doing that,” Derkits said.He admitted that he didn’t know if he could preach that day. “I wasn’t sure I could say one word without crying,” said Derkits, whose family lost much when Harvey destroyed the rectory. He has been helping to lead recovery efforts in his town.At St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church in Houston, the rector, the Rev. Rob Price, confessed that he had been busy that week with “the work of doing the word of God and I haven’t had as much time as I’d like to prepare for preaching upon the word of God.”Luckily, he said, the lectionary came to the rescue. The appointed readings included the story of Moses standing on holy ground before the burning bush to receive God’s call to lead his people out of misery, Paul’s exhortation to the Romans not to lag in zeal and be ardent in spirit as they serve the Lord, and Jesus’ call to his disciples to take up their cross and follow him.Price said he had seen St. Dunstan parishioners engaged in “simple acts of love that will persist long after the media has left Houston.” And, he pledged that “we will be walking with our [church] family and your friends for as long as it takes.”At St. Martin’s, Levenson told his congregation that God was everywhere while Harvey was submerging Houston under nearly 52 inches of rain, whether they themselves suffered damage or had to be rescued – or not. He urged his listeners to act.“In the wake of nature’s havoc, now comes the work of God. You, as you stand before him in prayer, are like Moses,” he said, telling them they have the opportunity to show the world that they are the body of Christ. “You, as you allow genuine love to pour out of you. You, as you show others you’re his disciples by loving” the people in their communities.He warned against despair. “You can allow this storm to define you in such a way that you are frozen and stagnant, or you can allow this storm to pass through us and over us, because as its waters recede, even slowly in some places, life will begin again,” Levenson said.The waters of baptism are stronger that Harvey’s flood, he said, urging the congregation to transplant the holy ground of their worship space into the community. “My friends, it’s what we’re called to do,” he said.That ministry will help rebuild Harvey-hit areas, preachers said.A thank-you sign hangs outside a downtown hotel in Houston that is housing emergency response teams in the aftermath of Harvey. Hebrews 6:10 says, “For God is not unjust; he will not overlook your work and the love that you showed for his sake in serving the saints, as you still do.” Photo: REUTERS/Mike BlakeAt St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Rockport, Texas, also near where Harvey first came on land, the Rev. Jim Friedel pointed to symbolic new growth. “When I returned from evacuating a few days ago, every single tree was bare,” he said. “But today, if you look closely at the oak trees on our church grounds, new leaves are budding.”Friedel held Eucharist in the church’s parking lot in muggy weather under a blazing sun. During the readings, a neighboring congregation could be heard singing “Bless the Lord, my soul.”“We have an opportunity to respond in a way that will give new life,” the rector said as helicopters droned overhead.Reminding worshippers that God heard the cries of the Israelites, Friedel said “he has heard our cries and the cries of this community. We have suffered, and now with grateful hearts, we will press forward.”The Very Rev. Barkley Thompson, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Houston, also used the image of communities being stripped bare but beginning to show new life. In a Sept. 3 blog post, he described what Houston looked like “after the world ended.”“In the wake of disaster, beyond the wilderness, when everything is stripped bare, the God whom fire cannot consume and water cannot drown comes to us and says, ‘I will send you,’ ” he wrote. “God is calling now – us, this cathedral, this community of disciples – and he does not send us alone. We are Christ Church together, and we will see the dawn.”Eucharist at Trinity by the Sea in neighboring Port Aransas took place with the sounds of recovery in the background. Derkits thanked the police chief, mayor and city manager for being at the service, and for their leadership.He said that Paul could have found on the battered streets of Port Aransas the basis for the inventory of Christian behavior that he gave to the Romans.“This is what the kingdom of God looks like; this is what the Son of Man coming into his kingdom looks like,” Derkits said. “People are reaching out in love to each other and so we are living out this gospel teaching and we are living out the teaching of Romans.”Earlier in the service, Derkits gathered children around the baptismal font and showed them shells he had found along the hurricane-littered beach. He called them treasures that Harvey had washed up, adding that they were symbols of what was happening in their city.“We’ve had this challenging terrible hurricane that’s come through and all these treasures have been stirred up in people’s hearts,” he said, explaining how residents and volunteers alike were taking care of the city and of each other.He asked each child to take a shell to serve “as a reminder to watch out for the treasures because even though we’ve had a hard time and it’s going to be a rough road ahead, there’s lots of good treasures out there to be had.”Diocese of Texas Bishop Andy Doyle told the congregation at St. Cuthbert Episcopal Church in Houston that seeing Episcopalians helping their communities was among the most joyous parts of his job.“Nothing shows me the kingdom and God’s love for us more than the work you all have undertaken in the last week and the work that is before you,” he said in his sermon. “And it would be easy to say we don’t have the resources or we don’t know what we’re doing. We’re not professionals. We don’t know about remediation. But that does not stop the kingdom of God.“God gives us a spirit to walk into the breach and change people’s lives. Christ’s church is at its best when it puts down all its mightiness, when it puts down all its victory, when it puts down its ‘church knows all’ attitude. And instead, it is at its best when it rolls up its sleeves and creates a new community out of generosity, hospitality, vulnerability and love.”To the east, the Rev. Sharon A. Alexander, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, recalled for her congregation Hurricane Katrina in 2005, last year’s so-called 1,000-year flood in Baton Rouge and her city’s deep economic connections to Texas through the energy and chemical industries.“They extended their help to us last year after our flood. It is our turn to return the favor. It is not in our DNA at Trinity to ignore the suffering of others,” she said of Texans. “You all have demonstrated many times qualities set forth in today’s passage from Romans: hope, zeal, prayer, hospitality – these are keys to the kingdom that we have inherited from St. Peter.”Alexander said Trinity will use those keys to help people in the Beaumont, Texas area. She asked parishioners to ask in their prayers “how we can be bearers of Jesus’ compassion and hope, as we were once the receivers of these holy gifts.”Preachers as far away as California spoke of Harvey. The Rev. Peggy Bryan, pastoral assistant at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, in Saratoga, California, described how her two sons and their families, spared from the flooding in Houston, had taken in evacuees – human, dog and guinea pig. In part, she said, their actions reciprocated the help they received in the wake of Hurricane Rita in September 2005.Bryan noted that both CNN and Breitbart News had acknowledged this sort of volunteerism on the part of ordinary people. “Seriously, if those two news sources can spin the same direction, even for a fleeting moment, there is hope,” she said. “And it’s not hope for more unifying disasters but hope we can pursue bold love and courageous hospitality, so one divine day it’s not radical, but natural.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is interim managing editor of the Episcopal News Service.last_img read more

La ‘ofrenda de la viuda’ de los episcopales está haciendo…

first_img Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls La ‘ofrenda de la viuda’ de los episcopales está haciendo grandes obras de asistencia en recientes desastres El Consejo Ejecutivo se actualiza respecto a la respuesta del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Hurricane Harvey, 2017 Hurricanes, Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN 2:04 Hurricane Maria Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Executive Council October 2017, Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Executive Council, “Somos una ofrenda de viuda”, reconoció Nelson. “El dinero que tenemos  —y aún sigue entrando y todo el mundo está haciendo lo mejor que puede— en modo alguno es lo que se necesita. Somos la ofrenda de la viuda, en consecuencia debemos pensar cuidadosamente adónde va esa ofrenda y cómo aprovechamos nuestras relaciones, cómo nos interconectamos con otros recursos y no nos consideramos como el único recurso para nuestras iglesias”.Nelson instó a tener paciencia mientras cada vez más episcopales quieren acudir a las zonas más afectadas y echar una mano. Esas zonas estarán listas para recibir a voluntarios en diferentes momentos, en dependencia de la situación sobre el terreno. “Nadie está bastante actualizado aún”, afirmó ella.Ahora mismo, hay una gran necesidad de pilotos y de aviones que puedan volar en zonas donde no están funcionando los sistemas de tránsito aéreo. “Buscamos vías despejadas y utilizables en que podamos confiar para llevar suministros a las islas”, dijo.Nelson también instó a los episcopales a mantenerse preparados con sus equipajes listos. “Lo digo en serio”, recalcó. “No sabemos lo que va a suceder el año próximo o mañana o con las tormentas de invierno o lo que sea. Luego, piensen en nosotros y en su familia, en su Iglesia, en su diócesis —cómo estarán en contacto unos con otros, cómo [podrían] vivir solos al menos durante dos semanas.“No hay quien venga a librarnos. Debemos estar realmente atentos unos de otros”.El Rdo. Jabriel Ballentine, miembro del Consejo, describió con lágrimas en los ojos cómo Nelson y otros miembros del personal del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo lo apoyaron después del huracán Irma mientras él trataba de indagar por el destino de sus padres que viven en Charlotte Amalie en la isla de Santo Tomás [St. Thomas] en las Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU., donde él nació.“Fueron tres días en que yo no sabía si mis padres estaban vivos”, dijo él, pero la gente del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo lo acompañó durante ese tiempo. La madre de Ballentine, Rosalie, es miembro de la junta de la agrupación y también es la miembro laico de la Iglesia Episcopal ante el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano.“Muchísimas gracias por todo lo que ustedes hacen”, dijo Ballentine. “Advierto que es un pequeño óbolo, pero extraordinario. Y de esos [óbolos] necesitamos más”.Ballentine también pidió la ayuda del Consejo al recordar que “somos estadounidenses —se supone que lo somos de todos modos— no dejen que se nos olvide que somos episcopales”.El Rdo. John Floberg, miembro del Consejo proveniente de Dakota del Norte y sacerdote supervisor de las tres congregaciones episcopales de la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock] recibió una emotiva respuesta del Consejo cuando se levantó y explicó a los miembros cómo las personas en las asambleas indias (powwows) honran a los bailarines cuyo desempeño artístico valoran. “Ponen dinero a los pies del bailarín”, dijo. “Eso es lo que yo voy a hacer”.Floberg caminó hasta el centro del salón, se inclinó y puso dinero en el suelo frente al podio donde Nelson estaba hablando. Sus colegas aplaudieron y siguieron su ejemplo mientras Nelson seguía respondiendo preguntas.El resto de la reuniónLa reunión del Consejo del 18 al 21 de octubre tiene lugar en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo. Las reuniones de comités ocuparán también la mayor parte de la jornada del 20 de octubre y, el 21, cada uno de los comités informará al pleno y someterá resoluciones a la consideración del organismo.Algunos miembros del Consejo están enviando mensajes vía Twitter desde la reunión valiéndose del hashtag #ExCoun.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, más el Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio]. Además, el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados, el Secretario, el Director de Operaciones, el Tesorero y Director de Finanzas tienen asiento y voz, pero no voto.Artículos anteriores de ENS sobre la reunión pueden encontrarse aquí .– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es jefa de redacción interina de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri.* Conocida también en español como Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. “Fondo” nos parece un término más idóneo y así lo usaremos de ahora en adelante (N. del T.) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Los episcopales se unen en una “gran cadena de energía y recursos” dentro y fuera de la Iglesia en respuesta a recientes desastres, dice ante el Consejo Ejecutivo, el 19 de octubre, Abagail Nelson, vicepresidente primera de programas del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] La hoja de ruta del Movimiento de Jesús de la Iglesia Episcopal ha estado orientando a los episcopales en su respuesta a la cadena de desastres que han sacudido al mundo en los últimos dos meses.“Uno puede verlo en que tenemos varios departamentos del personal del Obispo Primado, las diócesis compañeras,  el  Seguro de la Iglesia, nosotros mismos [en el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo]*, episcopales en la diáspora, amigos y buenas personas de fe, todos trabajando juntos”, dijo Abagail Nelson, vicepresidente primera de programas del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo  ante el Consejo Ejecutivo el 19 de octubre.Nelson le dio a los miembros del Consejo una perspectiva general del tipo de trabajo que el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo respalda mediante lo que ella llamó “esta gran cadena de energía y recursos” que le permite a los episcopales “hacer mucho más de lo que podemos hacer solos”. Esa labor incluye empeños tales como la instalación de herramientas virtuales para permitirles a los episcopales comunicarse entre sí y estar al tanto del trabajo hecho y de la ayuda que se necesita. La organización apoya también iniciativas tales como ayudar a proporcionar agua, lonas, baterías solares, así como cuidado pastoral, y a conectarse con otras agencias de socorro y gubernamentales”.“Uno puede ver atisbos del Movimiento de Jesús cuando los clérigos hablan en las reuniones del gobierno”, dijo ella, explicando que esos clérigos estaban abogando a favor de sus comunidades. “Uno puede verlo en la manera en las personas sin hogar viven en las propiedades de la Iglesia en los cayos de la Florida. Puede verlo en la manera en que intentamos precisar, por mensajes de texto y de viva voz, la mejor forma de prestar apoyo”.Desde principios de agosto, el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo ha estado respondiendo, en asociación con episcopales y anglicanos regionales y otras agencias de socorro, a los efectos de:Graves inundaciones en el estado indio de Bengala Occidental luego de intensas lluvias en julio y agosto.El huracán Harvey, que tocó tierra como una tormenta de categoría 4 cerca de Rockport, Texas, en la barrera insular del litoral de Corpus Christi el 25 de agoto, y luego avanzó hacia el noroeste para inundar el área metropolitana de Houston.El huracán Irma, que pulverizó las islas de Sotavento como una tormenta de categoría 5 del 5 al 6 de septiembre para avanzar luego hacia el norte para azotar Florida y Georgia.Un terremoto de primera magnitud, que ocasionó grandes daños, el 19 de septiembre, en la zona central de México, incluidos la Ciudad de México, y en [los estados de] Oaxaca, Guerrero , Morelos y Puebla.El huracán María, de categoría 4 que arrasó las Islas Vírgenes y Puerto Rico el 20 de septiembre.Los incendios forestales en el norte de California que estallaron en la noche del 8 de octubre y que todavía siguen activos.“Yo he estado aquí 18 años y nunca he visto nada como esto”, dijo Nelson refiriéndose a su trabajo con el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. “Estamos aquí viviendo en tiempos extraordinarios y creo que exigen una extraordinaria respuesta de parte nuestra”. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hurricane Irma, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 19, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Diocese of Colombo to plant 20,000 trees in day-long environmental…

first_imgDiocese of Colombo to plant 20,000 trees in day-long environmental push Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 12, 2018 at 12:49 pm This is a beautiful environmental-social-economic investment. The area in desperate need for a similar investment is the West Bank where olive trees(and also other fruit, almond trees) have been savagely burned, uprooted by Jewish settlers. Certainly such an investment would demonstrate pro-active support and compassionate action for the Palestinian villagers who have been subjected to such settler actions for generations while the trees are the “lifeblood” of Palestinian ancestry for thousands of years! We Episcopalians must demonstrate, initiate this critical action Now and sustain for future plantings and generations! [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of Ceylon’s Diocese of Colombo has launched a major environmental protection scheme which will see 20,000 trees planted on a single day in 2019. A “trial run” will see 2000 trees planted on 24 September 2018 ahead of the main Plant Trees, Plant Life event on 14 September 2019. A whole range of organizations are taking part in the event, including churches, the diocesan youth department, church schools, the Mothers’ Union and the government’s forestry department – the Ministry of Mahaweli Development and Environment.“Why ‘Plant Trees?’”, the Diocese said on its Facebook page, “We plant trees as an act of obedience to God. This makes it a spiritual experience. Being concerned for our environment is being concerned for what God cares for.”Already, some 100 trees were planted when the event was launched last month on World Environmental day – 5 June – at St Thomas’ College in Mount Lavinia. Churches across the diocese also planted trees on that day in preparation for the main event in 2019.Full article here. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (1) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Environment & Climate Change Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Jul 12, 2018 Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Asia, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Erna Lund says: Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Anglican Church of Southern Africa adopts provincial safeguarding measures

first_imgAnglican Church of Southern Africa adopts provincial safeguarding measures Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion Rector Collierville, TN Africa, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba has announced new safeguarding measures designed to make churches in South Africa safer. The new measures will require those seeking ordination to obtain a police clearance certificate; and they include a new national email contact point for reporting allegations of abuse. The move follows a number of allegations made this year of abuse by priests.Read the full article here. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Oct 3, 2018 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Episcopal dioceses, organizations join lawsuit against Trump’s border wall

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Donald Trump, Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In July, the Supreme Court ruled that construction of the border wall could begin as litigation continued. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 60 miles of the wall have been completed as of Aug. 24, 13 percent of what Trump promised to build by the end of 2020. However, Axios reported that all the new construction merely replaced pre-existing walls and fences.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] The dioceses of Long Island and Western Massachusetts, as well as Trinity Church Wall Street and Boston-based Episcopal City Mission, have joined a lawsuit that seeks to stop President Donald Trump from redirecting federal funds to build a wall on the United States’ southern border.They and 71 other religious organizations, led by the Muslim Bar Association of New York, entered an amici curiae (or “friends of the court”) brief dated Aug. 22 in support of the lawsuit, which was filed in February by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of the Sierra Club and the Southern Border Communities Coalition. The suit challenges Trump’s use of emergency powers to divert funds marked for other purposes to construct a border wall after Congress refused to appropriate $5.7 billion for it. The emergency powers that Trump invoked only apply to military construction projects that are necessary to support the armed forces, the Sierra Club says.The amici brief expresses the religious groups’ concern that Trump’s use of emergency powers to access funds without congressional approval sets a dangerous precedent.“President Trump’s effort to build a wall is targeted at a specific disfavored group, namely immigrants entering the United States through the southern border. But the risks of an unchecked executive with access to unlimited funds to implement its agenda are shared by all potentially-disfavored groups. … All amici are justly concerned that the president will, if permitted, use his newfound power to re-direct appropriations to impinge on the rights of religious minorities,” the brief says.The bishops of Long Island and Western Massachusetts expressed their views on Trump’s actions in brief statements of interest.“The Bishop of the Diocese fully supports this effort for a permanent injunction to stop the administration (federal government) from mis-directing and illegally using Defense Department and Treasury funds to construct an immoral, impractical and useless border wall,” the statement from the Diocese of Long Island says. “The administration’s fixation with constructing this wall is representative of the administration’s sinful and unlawful scapegoating of asylum seekers to promote an un-American, protectionist, nationalist agenda. It must not be allowed to happen.”The Rt. Rev. Douglas Fisher, bishop of Western Massachusetts, also combined concerns about the legality of Trump’s emergency declaration and the morality of his administration’s treatment of immigrants in his statement.“The president’s use of government funds for building the southern border wall is a clear violation of the Congress’ power of the purse. The situation at our southern border may quite rightly be seen as a crisis as the president’s policy shifts have stranded asylum seekers in Mexico for an indeterminate time. The impact of his change to national policy has endangered the lives of people who seek safety here. What has been done to the children under orders from the President, is immoral and an affront to human dignity,” Fisher wrote on behalf of his diocese.Two other Episcopal organizations known for their public advocacy also signed onto the brief.“President Trump’s decision to build a wall with government funding targets those people with whom we are most called to demonstrate solidarity,” Episcopal City Mission, which facilitates action on various social justice issues in Massachusetts, wrote in its statement.Trinity Church Wall Street, in addition to outlining its opposition to Trump’s emergency declaration, listed the actions it has taken to support immigrants, refugees and asylum-seekers, including organizing trips to the border, convening a conference about migration, advocating for detention center reform, supporting individual asylum-seekers and participating in rallies and vigils, such as an overnight “tent city” in Trinity’s churchyard.The other 71 organizations who signed the brief represented Jews, Muslims and Christians of many denominations, as well as Unitarian Universalists and interfaith groups. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Egan MillardPosted Aug 27, 2019 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Faith & Politics, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal dioceses, organizations join lawsuit against Trump’s border wall Immigration Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more