COLEMAN, MICHAEL JOSEPH

first_imgThe wake in remembrance of Michael Joseph Coleman, 85, will be held Wednesday July 5 from 7 to 9 p.m., at the Lawton-Turso Funeral Home, 7th and Washington streets, Hoboken. A memorial mass will take place Thursday July 6 at 2 p.m. in St. Francis Church, 3rd and Jefferson Sts., Hoboken.He passed away peacefully June 16 at the VA hospital in East Orange. A long-time resident of Hoboken, Michael was born in St. Paul, Minn. and attended St. Thomas College before serving in Korea as a member of the Air Force. He returned to school to earn an MA degree in Industrial Relations, then piloted for Eastern Airlines. In 1959, he accepted a position as President of the Young Christian Workers in Chicago followed by work with the Commission for Economic Development, a group providing support to developing nations.In 1965 Mike worked for the US Economic Development Administration, Dept. of Commerce in civil rights compliance. Michael came to Hoboken in 1968 to serve as executive director of the Model Cities Program, an effort of the Johnson Administration for urban renewal of inner cities. For eight years he was instrumental in starting the dynamic revitalization of Hoboken that continues today. Following his work with Model Cities, Mike founded a consulting business, Michael Coleman Associates. Michael was a diligent practitioner of Tai Chi, loved flying, sailing and spending time helping his friends and family.He is survived by his children and extended family: first wife, Rae Barsotti Coleman; Michael and Yvonn Coleman; Jennifer and Ted Norman; Suzanne and Flip Herndon; son James who died in 2005, and son Steven; his eight grandchildren: Alexander and Sebastian; Delaney, Eve, and Colin; Coleman, Mason, and Miles; his brother Pat and wife, Judy and their children; and in memoriam, his brother, George, who died in 1982, survived by his wife, Joann and two children; along with many nieces and nephews spread around the country.Services arranged by the Lawton-Turso Funeral Home, Hoboken.last_img read more